Oxford Local Plan 2036: Proposed Submission Draft Consultation

Chapter 9- Areas of Change and Site Allocations

9. Areas of Change and Site Allocations


9.1 A site allocation is a planning policy that describes what type of land use,
or mix of uses, would be acceptable on a specific site or whether the site
is protected for certain types of development. The purpose of the site
allocations is to allocate sites for built development or to maintain a type
of built development on a site. Site allocations are important because they
give guidance and certainty to developers and landowners and they help
local people understand what may happen in their neighbourhood in the
future. They provide a positive policy towards redevelopment of the site
and help ensure the right type and amount of development happens in
the right place, in accordance with the Strategy of this Local Plan and the
National Planning Policy Framework.


9.2 This chapter highlights Areas of Change within the city, and sets out
specific site allocation policies. Site allocation policies are accompanied by
a range of icons used to quickly identify key features of the site. These
icons are as follows:

Legend of icons/symbols

 

10 metre buffer to watercourse

A site that is adjacent to or includes a watercourse. Opportunities should be taken to protect and enhance the watercourse that is on or adjacent to the site. At least a 10 metre buffer should be retained between the watercourse and the built development.

CH4

Potentially Contaminated Sites

Red icon: A site that has been identified as having potentially significant contamination issues.  Applications will be required to demonstrate that contamination issues can be resolved during the planning application stage and will be required to undertake an appropriate contamination site investigation as part of any secured planning permission.

Orange icon: A site that has been identified as having potential contamination issues. Applications will be required to undertake an appropriate contamination site investigation as part of any secured planning permission.

 

Significant noise

A site that is subject to significant environmental noise from one or more sources. Applications are required to be accompanied by an Acoustic Design Statement on submission.

 

Potential air quality concern

A site that has the potential to raise concerns in terms of air quality. Where development is proposed, applicants must demonstrate that necessary mitigation measures are incorporated. However, it is a requirement of Oxford City Council that all the applications for major development in the city submit an air quality assessment, whether or not the poor air quality symbol is present.

 

Archaeological interest

A site that has known archaeological interest or potential interest, or is in the City Centre Archaeological Area. Other sites may also require further archaeological assessment and evaluation. Sufficient information should be provided to define the character and extent of known or potential archaeological deposits. Development will not be permitted if the applicant fails to demonstrate that there will be no loss or damage to important historic features or their setting. (A site without this symbol does not necessarily have no archaeological potential. The potential may instead be unclear or unknown. )

Basement development

A site that lies within an area with potentially high groundwater. Basement development could act as a blockage to groundwater flows and cause groundwater flooding. Where basement development is proposed, applicants will be expected to assess the feasibility of underground development in relation to groundwater flows.

 

Groundwater recharge

A site that is on or near the North Oxford gravel terrace and development of which could potentially have an impact on the groundwater flow, as well as the recharge of groundwater to the Oxford Meadows SAC. Development proposals must be accompanied by a hydrological survey assessing the impact of development proposals on groundwater and must incorporate sustainable drainage.

 

Improving walking and cycling

A site where opportunities are present to increase connectivity and sustainable movement and transport through improvements to walking and cycling links.

 

Sensitive to the Cowley Branch Line

A site that lies on or adjacent to the Cowley Branch Line.  Development of this site should not compromise the reopening of this line for passengers which also includes safeguarding land for new stations. 

 

Proximity to railway

A site that is close to a railway. To eliminate any risk to railway operations and to ensure the safe operation of the railway, applicants must demonstrate that the design of development considers guidance provided by Network Rail.

 

Site within the Eastern Arc

A site that is within the geographical area of the Eastern Arc. The Eastern Arc is comprised of the outer wards in the east, south, and south-east of Oxford that the Local Transport Plan 4 has identified as an area where future travel demand will be focused. Opportunities should be taken to enhance pedestrian and cycle links to a future Eastern Arc Rapid Transit (EART) station.

 

Oxford City Centre


9.4 Context
Much of the city centre is covered by the Central Conservation Area and
contains the medieval core of the university. The city centre also includes
the West End, which is the area of the city centre with the main opportunity
for growth (see separate section below). There are opportunities to
manage the competing interests in the city centre. This may be possible
through a review of the access and transport arrangements (for example
by removing unnecessary trips/miles journeyed); providing opportunities to
access “town centre uses” in alternative locations (for example providing
for more facilities in district or local centres); and reviewing the role of
specific streets/areas of the city centre to provide for different needs (for
example a restaurant district or tourist focused area) and increasing the
public realm and capacity of streets.


9.5 Key heritage considerations
The Central Area Conservation Appraisal has identified principal issues in
the Central Conservation Area, which are:
• Pressure on public space in the core area streets from pedestrian
saturation and buses
• Lack of accessible squares and greens space
• Controlled access to green space
• Uncertain retail future
• Design of new buildings
• Managing the setting
• Conservation area boundary on the western side


9.6 Building heights and density
The city centre is particularly sensitive to high buildings because it is the
location of the historic buildings that create the skyline and taller buildings
Policy DH2 will be particularly relevant in this location. The city centre does
have much higher density development, and is a suitable location for it.


9.7 Vision
The Central Conservation Area Appraisal identifies opportunities to
enhance the conservation in ways that would sustain the city’s cultural,
economic and social prosperity. Planning permission will only be granted
for new development within the area where it can be demonstrated that it
takes opportunities to deliver the following, where relevant:
• Rebalance the pace within streets from vehicles to pedestrians
• Identify sites for a new network of ‘micro parks’ where people can stop
and dwell in streets
• Increase public access to existing green spaces
• Promote development of opportunity sites in ways which contribute to
and celebrate the characteristics of the city that make it so distinctive
and special.


Area of Change: West End and Osney Mead


9.8 Context
The West End is the south west corner of the city centre, including Oxford
Station. Osney Mead sits on the other side of the river, but with good
connectivity to Oxford Station and potential to be better integrated with
the city centre via a bridge to the West End. Much of the area is underutilised
and does not reflect Oxford’s international reputation or live up to
its potential.

9.9 The West End Area Action Plan 2007-2016 was adopted in 2008.
Developments such as the Westgate Centre and public realm improvements
at Frideswide Square and Castle Mill Stream have started to bring improved
connectivity and enhance the quality of the area. As Oxford University
increases its ownership of land at Osney Mead there is an increased
potential to further integrate and enhance this whole area to the south
west of the centre and around the station.


9.10 Key heritage considerations
There is a great deal of historic interest contained within the West End,
which must be given the appropriate level of consideration when new
developments are proposed to ensure that the combination of new and old
are well designed and the historic features are respected and enhanced.
Many historic buildings and street patterns remain in the area and should
be used to guide design of new development. The visual impact of new
development could add a contemporary element to views of Oxford’s
historic skyline and existing historic buildings, without destroying their
character.


9.11 Key considerations are the setting of Listed Buildings, the historic character
of the Central Conservation Area in Jericho and Osney, avoiding visual
competition to the city centre skyline and in elevated views from the
city centre. Osney Mead is particularly sensitive in terms of views, being
prominent in the View Cones from Raleigh Park and Boars Hill.


9.12 Building heights and density
Development at 15m will create competition in the views from St Mary’s.
Development at 18m will create competition in the views from Boars Hill.
Development exceeding 15m should be very carefully considered and
designed in terms of the impact of the height.


9.13 As well as avoiding buildings that obscure the skyline, the impacts of
lower development on the foreground part of the view must achieve an
enhancement of the area.


9.14 Vision
Planning permission will only be granted for new development within the
area where it can be demonstrated that it takes opportunities to deliver the
following, where relevant:
• Create high-density urban living that makes efficient use of land
• Maintain a vibrant mix of uses
• Maximise the area’s contribution to Oxford’s knowledge economy
• Enhance public realm along the waterways
• Enhance connectivity throughout the area, including along and across
waterways
• Enhance the pedestrian and cycling experience
• Ensure that the heritage of the area informs and guides new
development proposals
• Create easy and attractive transport interchange
• Reduce car parking


9.15 West End
This site includes a huge variety of buildings and uses including retail,
residential, community, cultural and evening economy uses, Oxford
and Cherwell Valley College, University of Oxford colleges and offices,
community centre, and the city’s key areas of public transport provision
and interchange, including Oxford Station and Gloucester Green bus and
coach station.

9.16 To ensure that the development makes the best use of the site and is well
designed the design code should be followed. It is expected that the site
will be developed as part of a comprehensive regeneration plan for the
area. With a number of different landowners within the site this would
help delivery and ensure that piecemeal development does not prejudice
the overall aim of a comprehensive regeneration of the site.


9.17 Sewerage network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether
an upgrade to the sewerage network is required. Up to three years lead in
time could be required to undertake any such works.


9.18 Residential development at sites in West End in Flood Zone 3a has been
justified through the sequential test. A Strategic Flood Risk Assessment
Level 2 was undertaken for three specific sites: Fire Station, Rewley
Road; the Island site and; the Oxpens site. This was to assess part b) of
the Exception Test. The SFRA Level 2 considered that the development
proposed was appropriate. Additional mitigation and/ or analysis may be
required to demonstrate compliance with part b) of the Exception Test
at the planning application stage for the Island site and the Oxpens site.
This is to be undertaken through a site-specific flood risk assessment
supporting the planning application. The site specific flood risk assessment
must demonstrate how the development will be safe otherwise planning
permission will not be granted.


9.19 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create through the redevelopment of
sites in the West End, upgrades to the network are likely to be required. As
such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended to ensure that
the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Osney Mead
Site area: 17.4 hectares/42.99 acres
Ward: Jericho and Osney
Landowner: A number of landowners own various plots.
The University of Oxford is the largest landowner
Current use: Industrial Estate
Flood Zone: FZ 3b


9.20 The site comprises the Osney Mead Industrial Estate. Surrounding land uses
are agriculture, residential and employment. Access is from Ferry Hinksey
Road and Osney Mead.


9.21 The estate is a Category 2 Employment site. It is in a central location
that offers one of the few opportunities for a range of employment uses
in the city, particularly in such an accessible location close to the train
station. It is important that its role in creating a diverse employment base
is maintained, as the site is an important part of Oxford’s employment
land supply. The site is not intensively used, and changes in technology
and use of space and the type of employment mean that the employment
function could be provided in a smaller space, as well as being enhanced.
There is significant potential to intensify uses of the site and introduce new
uses. There should be no loss in the number of jobs in B use classes at the
site. The largest landowner at the site is the University of Oxford. The site
presents an excellent opportunity to create an innovation park in a central
location close to the core of the university, that will contribute to Oxford’s
role in the knowledge and high-tech economy. Academic uses linked to
this could also be located at the site to maximise the benefit of linkages
between academic research and innovation.


9.22 Although currently separated from it, a new link across the river should be
provided to integrate the site with the city centre. It will also connect the
site with the new student development next to Oxpens. Therefore, if the
connection is in place, the site should begin to function as an extension
of the city centre. It would therefore be suitable for residential use that
may include student accommodation and employer-linked housing or
market housing. Delivery of housing should support and complement the
employment function of the site.


9.23 The site is suitable for medium high density development that is low to
medium rise. Osney and Botley is characteristically low rise and also the site
is sensitive in terms of views. It is within the High Building Area and view
cone. The High Buildings Technical Advice Note shows that buildings of
15m will create competition in views out from St Mary’s Tower. Buildings at
18m will create competition in the view from Boars Hill. The Assessment of
the Oxford View Cones Study 2015 also shows that low-rise development
is in the foreground of key views into historic core. Any negative impact on
views into or out of the historic core must be avoided.


9.24 New high-quality public open space should be created on the site. The
relationship and connection between the site and the canal and river should
be improved. The site is adjacent to the River Thames and pedestrian and
cycle access from the site to the tow path should be retained. Footpaths to
and through the site should be provided and enhanced. The physical and
visual permeability of the design will be important.

9.25 Residential development at this site in Flood Zone 3a has been justified through
the sequential test. A Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment was carried out for
this site to examine part b) of the Exception Test (which relates to whether the
development is safe). The Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment considered
the proposed development was appropriate and additional mitigation and/
or analysis may be required to demonstrate compliance with the Exception
Test at the planning application stage. This is to be undertaken through a site specific
FRA supporting the planning application. The site specific flood risk
assessment must demonstrate how the development will be safe otherwise
planning permission will not be granted.


9.26 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that
the new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network
are likely to be required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network
is recommended to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes
place to support development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Area of Change: Cowley Centre District Centre


9.27 Context
The Cowley Centre and the area around Between Towns Road provide an
important hub, with transport interchange, community facilities and retail
available. It is important for the local community and those from further
afield for whom it is their main centre. The area includes the Templars
Square Shopping Centre as well as multi-storey car parks, office blocks and
flats of 3-4 storeys and other social, leisure and community uses such as
pubs and cafes, some of which are as low as 1 storey.


9.28 The City Council will encourage schemes which make more efficient use
of the sites available and strengthen and diversify the range of services and
facilities on offer to the local community and its wider catchment area.


9.29 Key heritage considerations
Potential for impact on the historic character of the adjoining Temple
Cowley and Beauchamp Lane Conservation Areas and potential of tall
buildings to affect views out from St Mary’s Tower.


9.30 Building heights and density
High density development with residential at 100+ dph. Development is
varied in height currently, with some 1-2 storey buildings to the Hockmore
Tower which is 8 storeys of residential sitting above the Cowley Centre. At
12m (approximately 4 storeys) and above buildings may create a skylining
effect in views from St Mary’s Tower and will need careful design and
justification.


9.31 Vision
“To enhance the public realm to accommodate improved pedestrian
connectivity across Between Towns Road and an improved pedestrian and
cycle experience, whilst remaining a public interchange hub and important
hub”.


9.32 Planning permission will only be granted for new development within the
district centre where it can be demonstrated that it takes opportunities to
deliver the following, where relevant:
• Enhance the public realm;
• Improve connectivity across Between Towns Road;
• Make more efficient use of land by consolidating uses and through infill
and taller development;
• Improve access and visual links to the green space, enhance the existing
public realm and look for opportunities to create new areas of well
defined, attractive public open space
• Introduce more residential development, including on the upper floors
of existing commercial premises, other than existing offices that are
protected;
• Reduce the number of multi-storey car parks;
• Increased heights along Between Towns Road;
• Provide the range of retail units and type of environment that will
attract high quality operators; additional quality cafés, restaurants and
bars; attractive public realm;
• Support new employment on upper floors;
• Better reveal and enhance heritage assets and their setting.

Cowley Centre, Between Towns Road
Site area: 3.65 hectares/9.02 acres
Ward: Cowley
Landowner: Oxford City Council but Zurich Assurance have a long lease
Current use: Mixed use including retail, residential and car parks
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.33 This site includes the Templars Square shopping centre and a range of other
uses. The shopping centre and surrounding area is dated and is in need of
improvement. Cowley Centre is a Primary District Centre in Oxford’s retail
hierarchy as set out in the Oxford Local Plan 2036. A mix of town centre
and community uses are encouraged here.


9.34 To ensure that the development makes the best use of the site, delivers
the policy requirements and is well designed, it is desirable for the site to
be developed comprehensively. This could potentially be through a Cowley
Centre masterplan which would help delivery and ensure that piecemeal
development does not prejudice the overall aim of a comprehensive
regeneration of the area.


9.35 The design of development should consider the special character of the
Beauchamp Lane Conservation Area and should significantly improve the
design of the public realm. Development should take opportunities to
improve bus stopping areas, signage and facilities.


9.36 Water supply network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether
upgrades to the water supply capacity network are required. Up to three
years lead in time could be required to undertake any such works.

 

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Area of Change: Blackbird Leys District Centre


9.37 Context
Blackbird Leys is located on the outer ring of the Eastern By-Pass along
the south east edge of the city limits. It is approximately 5 km from the
City Centre and is well connected by public transport. It is the largest post
1960s suburb of Oxford, and is divided into two parts, a large 1960’s
development and a more recent residential area. The District Centre is
located at the centre of the 1960s estate with major employment sites to
the north, an industrial park north east, a science park to the south west
and the Kassam Stadium to the south. It currently comprises community
facilities, a health centre, shopping parade, library, leisure centre and two
schools. There is no strong retail or commercial offer and public space is
fragmented and dominated by the highway.


9.38 The area is typified by curvilinear road layouts with cul-de- sacs and
interconnecting pedestrian routes, centred on extensive accessible green
space. It contains a large number of suburban houses and flats which are
mostly two or three storey, but include two 15 storey tower blocks which
are landmark features of the area. The Northfield Brook creates a belt
of open space which includes areas of nature conservation interest and
the Spindleberry Nature Park. A mature avenue of Horse Chestnuts on
Windale Avenue leads to a group of historic agricultural buildings with an
architectural style which derives from the context of rural Oxfordshire. At
the heart of the District Centre is the Church of the Holy Family, an iconic
1960s heart shaped building with a paraboloid roof, designed as part of a
designated area of ecumenical experiment.


9.39 Key heritage considerations
Potential impact on the Oxford Stadium Conservation Area. The potential
of tall buildings to affect views out from St Mary’s Tower.


9.40 Building heights and density
High density, largely flatted residential development of 100+ dph.
Development is predominantly lo 2-3 storeys, but tower blocks reach
42.6m. At 15m and above buildings may create a skylining effect in views
from St Mary’s Tower and will need careful design and justification.


9.41 Vision
“To create a high quality environment that builds on the community
function of the district centre.”


9.42 Planning permission will only be granted for new development within the
district centre where it can be demonstrated that it takes opportunities to
deliver the following, where relevant:
• Improve permeability and connectivity to existing suburban residential
development
• Consider the potential for a future rail link to the city centre and
connectivity to this
• Intensify development to create a high density centre that retains and
improve community facilities, taking opportunities for co-location
• Introduce more residential development
• Enhance existing buildings and improve their relationship to the street
by creating active built frontages
• Rationalise car parking

Blackbird Leys Central Area
Site area: 8.10 hectares/20.01 acres
Ward: Blackbird Leys
Landowner: Various including Oxford City Council, Oxfordshire Council
and Oxford and Cherwell Valley College
Current use: Mixed use
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.43 Blackbird Leys District Centre is located to the south of the city in the
heart of Blackbird Leys. It is well served by public transport to and from
the Cowley Centre and Oxford city centre, as well as by local cycle and
pedestrian routes. It is important for the Blackbird Leys community and
includes facilities such as the community centre, library and leisure centre.
Blackbird Leys is a regeneration area and improved local facilities, shops,
new housing, educational and employment opportunities are appropriate.
Blackbird Leys is one of Oxford’s four district centres in the retail hierarchy
and a mix of town centre and community uses are encouraged here.


9.44 To ensure that the development makes the best use of the site, delivers the policy
requirements and is well designed, it is expected that the site will be developed
as part of a comprehensive regeneration plan for the area. With a number of
different landowners within the site this would help delivery and ensure that
piecemeal development does not prejudice the overall aim of a comprehensive
regeneration of the site. The site includes the tower block sites where there may
be potential to develop residential on the land around the base of the towers.


9.45 Both the water supply network capacity and the sewerage network capacity
in this area are unlikely to be able to support the demand anticipated
from this development. Investigations by Thames Water, funded by the
applicant, will be necessary to determine whether upgrades to the water
supply capacity and sewerage network are required. Up to three years lead
in time could be required to undertake any such works.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Area of Change: East Oxford-Cowley Road District Centre


9.46 Context
In spatial terms the District Centre is more elongated than the others, and
town centre uses can be found along the whole length of the street. The
Cowley Road is a busy arterial route into St Clements and the city centre at
one end, and Oxford Business Park and BMW at the other. It runs through
a highly populated area and the character of the district centre reflects this.
Surveys show that during the day time it is visited by local people who live
and work close enough to walk to the centre; the catchment area during
the evening is however much wider with the whole area being a draw to a
much bigger population.


9.47 Key heritage considerations
The setting and heritage considerations include the historic character of
Bartlemas and St Clement’s and Iffley Road Conservation Areas, as well as
Central and Headington Hill.


9.48 Building heights and density
Existing development in the area is predominantly 2-4 storeys, with a
maximum of 25.6m. Development at 15m could create competition with
the view to the city centre skyline from Crescent Road and Rose Hill and
also competition and change of character in elevated views to the southeast
from the city centre. Care will also have to be taken to ensure taller
buildings do not impact on attractive views of the south western hills
gained from elevated streets to the east of Cowley Road. Development
exceeding 15m should be very carefully considered and designed.

9.49 Development sites within the district centre should generally be high
density development of 100dph+ consisting of 1/2/3 bed apartments and
2/3/4 bed courtyard houses.


9.50 Vision
“To recognise the existing character and valued facilities of the centre
and build on these to support its long-term future as a vibrant, attractive
centre.”


9.51 Planning permission will only be granted for new development within the
district centre where it can be demonstrated that it takes opportunities to
deliver the following, where relevant:
• Consolidation of a retail core and a clearer definition of the primary
shopping area;
• Improve the quality of buildings and their relationship to the street,
shopfronts and signage
• Acknowledge the current restaurant and leisure provision;
• New residential development will be promoted on the upper floors
of existing commercial premises, other than existing offices that are
protected;
• Support new employment on upper floors;
• Public realm improvements for cyclists and pedestrians
• Enhancement and new opportunities for public open space such as tree
planting, redesigns etc
• Better reveal and enhance heritage assets and their setting

Area of Change: Summertown District Centre


9.52 Context
Summertown District Centre is located to the north of the city along the
Banbury Road, a major radial route and gateway into the city centre. It is
well served by public transport, cycle and pedestrian routes and is a vibrant
centre with a good retail mix, some major employers, a sports centre,
University buildings and a theatre. It is characterised by 2-3 storey, moderate
sized terraced properties whose lower floors have been converted to shop
frontages and large 3-4 storey commercial buildings of varying quality with
retail uses at ground floor. Banbury Road is wide with on street, short term
parking, good public realm, contemporary street furniture and mature
trees that make an important contribution to the townscape. To the east
and west of the district centre, streets form a regular pattern of Victorian
terraced housing and villas of architectural integrity leading to the River
Thames and Cherwell flood plains. A number of independent schools are
located adjacent to the centre. The Summertown Conservation Area is
immediately to the south.


9.53 Opportunities for development within the centre are primarily linked to
the Diamond Place site for which a Supplementary Planning Document
has been adopted. The Diamond Place site is of significance to the
Summertown area because of its size, its location behind the shopping
frontage and its current uses, all of which give potential for development
to bring considerable benefits. There is an excellent opportunity to develop
the site in a way that enhances the local area, without loss of the important
functions it already performs. The vision for that site is that a mix of uses
will bring extra activity to create a successful place which will have its own
identity as a quieter, more tranquil part of the district centre, offering an
attractive public open space for people to stop and enjoy.


9.54 Key heritage considerations
The setting of listed buildings and the character of the adjoining North
Oxford Victorian Suburb Conservation Area.


9.55 Building heights and density
Existing development in the area is predominantly 2-4 storeys, with a
maximum of 28.9m. Development at 18m will create competition in the
views from/across Elsfield and Boars Hill. Development at 24m will create
skylining in the views from St Mary’s. Development exceeding 18m should
be particularly carefully considered and designed in terms of the impact of
the height.


9.56 Development sites within the district centre should generally be high
density development of 100dph+ consisting of 1/2/3 bed apartments and
2/3/4 bed courtyard houses.


9.57 Vision
“To build on the mix of uses, vibrancy and distinct character of the district
centre.”


9.58 Planning permission will only be granted for new development within the
district centre where it can be demonstrated that it takes opportunities to
deliver the following, where relevant: Within the district centre:
• Rationalise the expanse of public and work place car parking that exists
to make more efficient use of land;
• Build on its independent offer by enhancing the variety and choice of
retailers;
• Support new residential and employment on upper fl oors;
• Create new areas of public realm;
• Build on the existing mix of uses by creating a high density environment
that contributes to the vibrancy of the place;
• Better integrate the landscape setting of Summertown with the district
centre;
• Improve pedestrian and cycle links to wider strategic routes into and
out of the city;
• Create a new neighbourhood of high density, contemporary housing;
and
• Create areas of amenity for new and existing neighbourhoods.

Summer Fields School Athletics Track
Site area: 1.38 hectares/3.41 acres
Ward: North
Landowner: Summer Fields School
Current use: Playing Fields
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.59 This site comprises playing fields in private use by Summer Fields School. In
summer an athletics track is painted onto the grass. The School is able to
relocate this facility within its relatively extensive grounds.


9.60 The site adjoins the Ferry Car Park. Access to the Athletics Track site would
be from the Banbury Road, through the redeveloped Diamond Place site.
The Diamond Place SPD requires access through the site into the Athletics
Track site to be designed-in.


9.61 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Diamond Place and Ewert House, Summertown
Site area: 1.73 hectares/4.27 acres
Ward: St Margarets
Landowner: Mainly Oxford City Council and University of Oxford
Current use: Public car parks, academic, offices
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.62 This site comprises car parks, office and academic use. The University
of Oxford intend to relocate the Examination Halls of Ewert House to
an alternative site and the City Council is seeking to make better use of
the car parks. The site is entirely within the designation of Summertown
District Centre so a mix of town centre uses should be encouraged here.
Development should not compromise the successful development of the
adjacent Summertown strategic site (residential development). There is high
potential for archaeological interest as the site is adjacent to cropmarks of
likely prehistoric or Roman date.


9.63 The City and County Council are seeking to reduce the use of the private
car within Oxford and a reduction in car parking would discourage car use
although the car park is important to local traders and its total loss would
be detrimental. The City Council has undertaken a review of its public car
parks and considers that there is potential for development above the car
park which will result in the loss of some car parking spaces. Sufficient
car parking spaces should be retained at a level at which the City Council
considers is reasonable to serve the local area bearing in mind the quality
of public transport to the area and the current level of usage of the car
park.


9.64 The retained car parking could be in a different form such as beneath
ground level (undercroft), decking or surface level with buildings above.
Parking beneath ground is less likely to be appropriate here due to its
potential impact on groundwater and any such proposal will need to assess
its effect on groundwater. High quality design will be expected in order to
deliver a safe parking environment with active frontages to ensure a sense
of safety and vitality with easy and clear access to shops. Provision must be
made for a temporary car park during construction.


9.65 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that
the new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network
are likely to be required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network
is recommended to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes
place to support development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

276 Banbury Road
Site area: 0.35 hectares/ 0.86 acres
Ward: Summertown
Landowner: 4 Urban Consulting Ltd
Current use: Retail on ground floor, offices above
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.66 This site in the Summertown district centre includes several retail units at
ground floor level and offices above, with a single storey building to the
north of the site used as Majestic Wine Warehouse.


9.67 The site is at a visually prominent location and is an important part of the
street scene of Banbury Road. High quality design with active frontages
will be required to ensure a sense of vitality with easy and clear access to
shops and other uses on the site.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Area of Change: Headington District Centre


9.68 Context
The centre reflects part of the historical, rural character of the area with
remnants of stone buildings and boundary walls, which play an important
part of the area’s character. The street varies in width through the centre
with wide pavements fronting properties in places. The district centre is
surrounded by inter and post-war housing and Victorian and Edwardian
terraces. Bury Knowle Park, a historic parkland, is located to the east of
the centre, Old Headington Conservation Area is located to the north and
Headington Quarry to the east.


9.69 Key heritage considerations
The setting of listed buildings within the area and also the impact on the
historic character of adjoining Conservation Areas (Headington Hill, Old
Headington and Headington Quarry).


9.70 Building heights and density
The centre is characterised by 2-3 storey, moderate sized terraced properties
whose lower floors have been converted to shop frontages and large 3-4
storey commercial buildings of varying quality that infill plots. There may
be an opportunity to redevelop some of these sites in a more intensive way
which would still be in keeping with the character and the function of the
centre. At 15m (approximately 5 storeys) and above buildings may create
a skylining effect in views in from Elsfield and will need careful design and
justification.


9.71 Vision
“To enhance the public realm to accommodate improved pedestrian
connectivity across Between Towns Road and an improved pedestrian and
cycle experience, whilst remaining a public interchange hub and important
hub.”


9.72 Planning permission will only be granted for new development within the
district centre where it can be demonstrated that it takes opportunities to
deliver the following, where relevant:
• Improve connectivity across London Road;
• Make more efficient use of land by consolidating uses and through
infill and taller development;
• Enhance the public realm


Area of Change: Cowley Branch Line


9.73 Context
The area surrounding the Cowley branch line is a major employment hub
with the large employers of BMW Group, Unipart, Oxford Science Park
and Oxford Business Park. The area consists of large scale, low density,
modern commercial developments, many of which are visually prominent.
The landscape is semi-rural and the Northfield and Littlemore Brookes are
important ecological features.


9.74 The opening up of passenger services along Oxford’s Cowley Branch Line
would provide an alternative public transport solution to opening up
the Eastern Arc to the city centre. The branch line currently extends just
over three miles eastwards from Kennington Junction, which is situated
approximately two miles south of Oxford station. The proposal would
include potential stations at Oxford Science Park and Oxford Business Park.

9.75 Key heritage considerations
Potential impact on the historic character of the adjoining Oxford Stadium
and Littlemore Conservation Areas. Potential impact on listed buildings in
the surrounding area (particularly Littlemore).


9.76 Building heights and density
High density residential and employment development that makes efficient
use of land will be expected. Development would need to be relatively tall
(21m) before affecting views from St Mary’s Tower. Buildings above this
height will need careful design and justification. Consideration should also
be given the nature of surrounding uses and impact on conservation areas
and listed buildings.


9.77 Vision
“To ensure good connectivity by providing enhanced pedestrian and cycle
access to the proposed stations.”


9.78 Planning permission will only be granted for new development within the
area of change where it can be demonstrated that it takes opportunities to
deliver the following, where relevant:
• To enhance existing tree cover and semi-rural landscape
• To retain wildlife corridor function of the brooks
• To safeguard land for proposed stations and access
• To make more efficient use of space through intensification of existing
sites and rationalisation of parking and reduction in surface-level car
parking
• Improved connectivity between different parts of the area


Unipart
Site area: 30.63 hectares/75.69 acres
Ward: Lye Valley
Landowner: Unipart Group
Current Use: Unipart Group
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.79 This large Category 1 employment site is an important site in providing
employment land to deliver the objectives of the Local Plan 2036.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Oxford BMW Mini Plant
Site area: 69.9 hectares/172.73 acres
Ward: Lye Valley
Landowner: BMW
Current Use: Car Plant
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.80 This is an important Category 1 employment site in Oxford and as such
should be protected to ensure it delivers the economic objectives of the
Local Plan 2036.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Oxford Science Park
Site area: 26.51 hectares/65.51 acres
Ward: Littlemore
Landowner: Prudential and Magdalen College, and Oxford City Council
Current use: Science Park and Vacant
Flood Zone: FZ3b but FZ1 for sequential test


9.81 This site is a Category 1 employment site and as such is a key site for
delivering the Oxford Local Plan’s aim of managed economic growth
to 2036. The site, established in 1991 is at the forefront of providing
employment opportunities based around research and development.
The site contains some undeveloped plots and it is anticipated that an
additional estimated 2,800m2 of floorspace can be provided.


9.82 There is potential for archaeological remains from the Saxon and Roman
periods which will need to be considered. The site lies in close proximity to
a listed building.


9.83 Slow worms are present on sites in surrounding areas. To allow them to
move between areas a buffer should be retained along the railway corridor.
More vulnerable development will be expected to be directed away from
Flood Zone 3b.

9.84 Access to the site is heavily dependent upon the private car. Opportunities
to enhance transport links to the site to provide an alternative from
the private car will be encouraged. This will include ensuring that any
opportunities to re-open the Cowley Branch Line is pursued and supporting
the County Council’s measure to improve bus services to the Eastern Arc.
These alternative transport opportunities will increase sustainability and
reduce need for cars. This is very much a place driven by the motor car.


9.85 Future development of the site should maximise opportunities to enhance
external areas to provide useful outdoor spaces and encourage activity
outdoors. Existing recreational facilities, such as football/tennis courts
but this could be integrated into the landscape to improve the quality of
outdoor space and setting for buildings. This attention to design should
provide an “enhanced sense of place” for the science park. Design of
future buildings should take the opportunity to demonstrate the principles
of science and technology and innovation in the architecture.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Oxford Business Park
Site area: 35.4 hectares/84.48 acres
Ward: Cowley
Landowner: Goodman
Current use: Vacant previously developed land
Flood Zone: FZ1

9.86 This site is a Category 1 Employment site and as such is a key site for
delivering the Oxford Local Plan’s aim of managed economic growth to
2036. Owing to the constrained nature of Oxford, the category 1 sites have
been afforded most protection to ensure that their employment uses are
maintained. The wider business park has already had permitted a number
of ancillary non-Class B uses and further such uses would be inappropriate
as they would prevent the delivery of employment on this site. There are a
few remaining plots still to be developed on the business park. These will
provide valuable B1 provision to meet the city’s need.


9.87 Oxfordshire County Council’s Local Transport Plan seeks to reduce car
parking on major employment sites within Oxford. As such both the
City and County Council will actively seek measures which will provide
opportunities for people to travel to the site other than by private car.
Improved bus connectivity to the Eastern Arc from across the city will be
supported. Access to this site would be enhanced considerably with the
opening up of the Cowley Branch Line to passengers.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Sandy Lane Recreation Ground and Land to the Rear of the Retail Park
Site area: 5.15 hectares/ 12.73 acres
Ward: Blackbird Leys
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: Green open space with sports pitches; vacant car parking
area off Ambassador Ave.
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.88 This site is comprised of the land adjacent to the Oxford Retail Park and
currently a disused car park (1.11ha) which was once used for storage
of production cars, until in 1995 permission was given for use of the site
as a car park for Rover employees. The site is adjacent to the Cowley
Branch line which forms the eastern and south eastern boundary to the
site. As such part of the site, the area currently being used as a car park,
must be safeguarded so that a small station allowing passenger access to
the branchline can be developed when the branchline is re-opened for
passenger trains. The larger, western part of the site has been used for
sports pitches, providing two full sized football pitches and one junior
pitch. However, there is no evidence of this formal use and the site is now
used for more informal recreational purposes. The site is generally fl at,
although access is taken from Blackbird Leys Road which is elevated above
the site resulting in a level difference. The eastern bypass runs parallel to
the north-western boundary of the site. There is planting adjacent to both
the bypass and railway line.


9.89 The site is surrounded by fairly low density and low height development,
which has allowed views of the hills and fields to the south to be retained.
The centre of the site would be most suitable for higher buildings, but even
here heights of more than 4 storeys would be likely to unsuitable. There
is room within the site for the 2 full sized and one junior sized playing
pitches to continue to be provided, alongside residential development and
a platform for the Cowley Branchline.


9.90 The western part of the site, adjacent to Blackbird Leys Road, is most
suitable for residential development, where it can be better connected to
existing residential areas, and close to public transport, walking and cycling
routes. The site should be reconfigured to allow retention and improvement
of sports pitches on the eastern part and residential development on the
western part.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Northfield Hostel, Sandy Lane West
Site area: 0.7 hectares/1.73 acres
Ward: Littlemore
Landowner: Oxfordshire County Council
Current use: Former Hostel for Northfield Special School
(currently unoccupied)
Flood Zone: FZ1

9.91 Northfield Hostel was previously in use as accommodation for pupils at
Northfield School. It is now unoccupied and Oxfordshire County Council
would like to relocate the school elsewhere in Oxfordshire.


9.92 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Edge of Playing Fields, Oxford Academy
Site area: 0.58 hectares/1.43 acres
Ward: Littlemore
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: School playing field
Flood Zone: FZ1
9.93 This site is part of the playing fields of Oxford Academy. It is at a lower level
than the rest of the playfields, and not an intrinsic or well-used part of the
outdoor sport offer. The site is adjacent to new development at Denny
Gardens, and there is potential to access the site through Denny Gardens.
The site is suitable for residential development, which could be employer-linked
housing provided for employees of the academy trust.


9.94 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that
the new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network
are likely to be required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network
is recommended to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes
place to support development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Kassam Stadium sites, Grenoble Road
Site area: 6.71 hectares/16.58 acres (Plot A)
2.29 hectares/5.66 acres (Plot B)
Ward: Littlemore
Landowner: Firoka Ltd and Oxford City Council
Current use: Football stadium, commercial leisure, food and drink, retail
and car parking
Flood Zone: FZ3b but FZ1 for sequential test


9.95 This site consists of two plots. Plot A includes the Kassam football stadium
and car parking. Plot B is to the north east of Plot A and is an overflow
car park for the football stadium. The sites are located within an area that
includes employment, residential, open space and commercial leisure and
is on the edge of the regeneration area of Blackbird Leys. Access is from
Grenoble Road and there are a number of public rights of way crossing the
site. The north east part of Plot A is a former landfill site but there is a high
potential for archaeological interest on other parts of that plot.


9.96 The car park is overflow for Oxford United Football Club (OUFC) who
consider that the land, including that around the stadium, could be used
more efficiently by providing the car parking in other ways and introducing
new development around the stadium. This site is suitable for a variety of
uses. A sufficient and appropriate level of car parking should be re-provided,
but there should be no increase in parking spaces and opportunities should
be identified to improve sustainable modes of transport to the area. Some
small shops ancillary to the stadium complex would be suitable providing
that they will not act as ‘destination’ retail shops. It is important to ensure
that any retail units are of an appropriate scale so that they do not conflict
with the viability of retail units in Blackbird Leys district centre.


9.97 Slow worms are present on sites in surrounding areas. To allow them to
move between areas a buffer should be retained along the railway corridor.
More vulnerable development will be expected to be directed away from
Flood Zone 3b.


9.98 Water supply network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether
upgrades to the water supply capacity network are required. Up to three
years lead in time could be required to undertake any such works.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Knights Road
Site area: 2.25 hectares/5.56 acres
Ward: Littlemore
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: Open space
Flood Zone: FZ3b but FZ1 for sequential test


9.99 This site comprises of some poor quality open space. It is adjacent to
Spindleberry Nature Park and the Kassam Stadium. The site was allocated
for development in the Sites and Housing Plan 2011-2026.


9.100 The site is suitable for residential use. Development should enhance the
quality and safety of the area. The relationship between new development
and remaining green areas, particularly Spindleberry Park should be carefully
considered. More vulnerable development will be expected to be directed
away from Flood Zone 3b. The site does not have any biodiversity protections,
but the ecological value of the site must be assessed as part of a planning
application and any harm avoided, mitigated or compensated for.

9.101 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Area of Change: Marston Road


9.102 Context
The area around the south west part of Marston Road includes several
currently underutilised sites with development potential. It is also a sensitive
area because of proximity to important parks, its proximity to the River
Cherwell and the presence of several listed buildings and some significant
archaeological interest as the site is near identified Civil War defences and
the Fairfax siege line. A visual connection to the historic significance of
the area remains as the open spaces capture the relationship between the
parliamentary cease line and no man’s land where fi ring happened from
the hill down to the town. It is important that development in this area
takes place with regard to the sensitivities and in a holistic manner.


9.103 The area creates a sense of a breathing space and distinct break with St
Clements, with both Headington Hill and Marston Road having a relatively
wide open street feel. This distinctive and positive character should be
maintained, but there are also opportunities to create a more active street
frontage on the eastern side of Marston Road and for development to
address Headington Park better, creating a better relationship between
development and the park, and extending the greenery of the park through
development sites.


9.104 Key heritage considerations
Potential impact on the historic character of the Headington Hill, St
Clement’s and Iffley Road and Beauchamp Lane Conservation Areas.


9.105 The setting of Listed Buildings including Headington Hill House and St
Clement’s Church.


9.106 The importance of the green setting to views from the historic core and
across the Cherwell Meadow.


9.107 Visual competition and change of character in elevated views to the east
from the city centre, obstruction or visual competition and change in
character in views to the centre from Raleigh Park and South Park.

9.108 Building heights and density
Development should make more efficient land, whilst being conscious of the
importance of the semi-rural setting of the area and heritage considerations
including views within the area and out from and in to the historic core.


9.109 Vision
Planning permission will only be granted for new development within the
area of change where it can be demonstrated that it takes opportunities to
deliver the following, where relevant:
• Maintain the heritage significance of the setting of Headington Hill Hall
• Maintain the frontage of St Clements Church and ensure the setting is
not compromised
• Maintain the rural character of Cuckoo Lane whilst taking opportunities
to enhance its function as a walking and cycling route.
• Retain the spacious rural feel.
• Develop the inactive frontages along the Marston Road
• Improved connectivity between different parts of the area
• Ensure protection of the New Marston SSSI


Government Buildings and Harcourt House, Marston Road
Site area: 2.36 hectares/3.16 acres
Ward: Headington Hill and Northway
Landowner: Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies (OCIS)
Current use: Storage area for OCIS
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.110 The site is adjacent to student accommodation in John Garne Way and
opposite academic uses of the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies (OCIS) a
Recognised Independent Centre of the University of Oxford. The pedestrian
and cycle way of Cuckoo Lane runs through the middle of the site and is
rural in character enclosed by mature vegetation. In terms of its ecological
features the site is within a wildlife corridor and in the vicinity of a SLINC
and within 600m of the New Marston Meadows SSSI. It should be retained
as a green route as well as being enhanced for cycling and walking. The
site is adjacent to the Headington Hill and the St Clements and Iffley Road
Conservation Areas. There is a high potential for archaeological interest as
the site is near identified Civil War defences and the Fairfax siege line.


9.111 OCIS is keen to use this site as an expansion to their existing site on the
opposite side of the road for student accommodation, visiting lecturers, staff
and their families with some ancillary teaching and social space. This type
of allocation would enable OCIS to focus their development around their
existing site. This site is on the Marston Road with good public transport
links to the city centre and hospitals. Student accommodation would be
suitable on the part of the site adjacent to existing student accommodation.
It has footpath access along Cuckoo Lane to the Oxford Brookes University
Headington campus. Consideration must be had of the impact of proposals
on the Headington Hill Conservation Area. There is no footway along Marston
Road for part of the site. Any new development should include a footway and
a pedestrian crossing to integrate the site with the Islamic Centre opposite.


9.112 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Headington Hill Hall and Clive Booth Student Village
Site area: 10.05 hectares/24.83 acres
Ward: Headington Hill and Northway
Landowner: Oxford Brookes
Current use: Academic institutional and student accommodation
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.113 This site is home to academic and teaching facilities of Oxford Brookes
and student accommodation. The entrance to the Headington Hill Hall
site is from Headington Hill, opposite Oxford Brookes’s main teaching and
academic centre at Gipsy Lane. The Clive Booth student village stretches
down to Marston Road. Oxford Brookes has plans to develop this site to
create a vibrant academic community with better facilities for students,
staff and the community, using the estate more efficiently. As well as
enabling Oxford Brookes to relocate from their Wheatley campus, it will
also contribute to their aim of reducing the number of students living
outside of university-managed accommodation, as a significant increase
in the number of student rooms can be accommodated in a redeveloped
Clive Booth Student Village.


9.114 Headington Hill Hall and Lodge House are both listed buildings and much of
the site falls within the Headington Hill Conservation Area. The conservation
area has a highly sensitive relationship with its setting. The well-treed slopes
of the hill are important to the setting of the City Centre Conservation
Area in views from the west, making an important contribution as the
green backdrop in the famous views of the city of ‘dreaming spires’ and
providing a number of features of historic or architectural interest in these
views. Furthermore, the special historic interest of the conservation area
includes the ability to look out from a number of viewpoints over the city
of Oxford and towards the ‘dreaming spires’. The character of views over
the city and from the historic core must be conserved. The grounds of
Headington Hill Hall create an attractive parkland landscape setting. The
site is steeply sloping in parts. Design must respond appropriately to the
characteristics of the site, ensure it has a positive impact on the setting
of the listed buildings and conservation area and the impact on views,
particularly from the historic core. Enhancing the landscape setting of the
site will be particularly important. There are a large number of significant
mature trees and some important tree groups, many of which will need
to be preserved. Overall, there must be no loss of tree canopy in the long
term. Development should have a positive impact on the relationship
between buildings and the parkland setting. Development that rises above
the treeline will need to be very carefully considered and justified.


9.115 Development proposals should improve the pedestrian and cycle
connectivity around the site, following desire lines between different parts
of the site and from Gipsy Lane.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Land surrounding St Clement’s Church
Site area: 1.61 hectares/ 3.98 acres
Ward: St Clement’s
Landowner: Magdalen College
Current use: Greenfi eld, green open space
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.116 The site surrounds the Grade II* listed St. Clement’s Church and its cemetery.
It is mainly greenfield, with a number of substantial trees that screen the
site from the church and road. The site also contains Air Training Corps
huts on the southern side. The ATC huts are a public amenity· With careful
design, scope exists for residential development that improves access,
permeability, and experience of the site. A small area of the western part
of the site lies in flood zone 2. The New Marston Meadows SSSI is within
600m of the site and is sensitive to changes in the flows and quality of
water in the river Cherwell due to being in its floodplain. There have been
issues previously with sewage leakages, therefore the network capacity
needs to be considered.

9.117 Careful design development would be required to accommodate
development whilst conserving and enhancing the Conservation Area and
the setting of the Church. The Conservation Area appraisal identifies the
open character of this part of Marston Road and the way in which St
Clement’s church is set within a green enclave as key features. To conserve
this character, development should be set back from Marston Road, and
kept relatively low. New development must respond to the setting, framing,
and response to the Grade II* listed church. A new vehicular access from
Marston Road should be made at the northern part of the site to ensure
the more sensitive area to the south is protected.


9.118 There is a still a clear visual relationship between the river and its meadows,
the church and the green slope of Headington Hill, with views from the
church across the Cherwell and towards Magdalen College, which should
be referenced in new development. The southern part of the site lies within
the South Park view cone and the impact of development on views of the
historic core should be carefully considered.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Area of Change: Old Road


9.119 Context
This area includes several hospitals and is also increasingly the focus of
medical research. It is beneficial to link clinical practice at the hospitals
strongly with university research. Recent development at the Old Road
Campus on the former Park Hospital site has introduced cutting-edge
medical research facilities to the area. Facilitating further development of
medical research, linked to clinical practice carried out in the hospitals, is
part of the Plan’s strategy. Development in this area should integrate with
the wider Headington area and should avoid negative impacts from traffic
generation.


9.120 The area is in a sensitive location, having an attractive and important
natural setting, with tree cover that is important in the views out from
the historic core and which contributes to the positive character of the
area. This is also a residential area, set within the urban area of Oxford,
and any development must consider how potential negative impacts on
residents will be avoided; in particular development should avoid traffic
generation that increases congestion in this already busy area. However,
more intensive and efficient use of the sites could be made. There are
many low buildings, and predominant heights are 2-4 storeys.


9.121 Key heritage considerations
Any impact on the historic character of the Headington Hill, St Clement’s
and Iffley Road and Beauchamp Lane Conservation Areas.


9.122 The setting of Listed Buildings including Headington Hill House and St
Clement’s Church.


9.123 The importance of the green setting to views from the historic core and
across the Cherwell Meadow.


9.124 Visual competition and change of character in elevated views to the east
from the city centre, obstruction or visual competition and change in
character in views to the centre from Raleigh Park and South Park.


9.125 Building heights and density
More intensive use of sites to make more efficient use of land, especially
of surface-level car parks and 1-2 storey buildings generally 4-5 storeys,
potential for some buildings up to 24m (higher would need considerable
justification and careful design), but also some buildings should be low
around the edges of the sites in consideration of neighbouring uses and
the rural setting.


9.126 Vision
Planning permission will only be granted for new development within the
area of change where it can be demonstrated that it takes opportunities to
deliver the following, where relevant:
• Uses should enhance or support use of the area of medical and clinical
research and practice
• Intensification should take place on existing sites
• Many of the sites include large and separated areas of surface-level
parking, which should be rationalised.
• Buildings higher than existing will often be appropriate, but at 24m a
skylining effect will be created, affecting important views out from St
Mary’s tower.
• Maintain and enhance the natural, rural edge setting along Boundary
Brook, Warneford Meadow and the Lye Valley along the south and east
boundary. This is an attractive and important natural setting providing a
pleasant contrast with the large scale and footprint utilitarian buildings
of the hospital.
• Better relate the development sites with their natural setting, improving
access and intervisibility.
• New buildings should be inspired by this natural setting in terms of
orientation, form and materials.
• A masterplan approach for individual sites or across the sites is
encouraged.
• New buildings should have active frontages to avoid creating large
buildings and dead, quiet streets.
• Retain the backdrop of mature trees and views to it to help new
development better assimilate into the landscape.


Churchill Hospital Site
Site area: 22.73 hectares/56.17 acres
Ward: Churchill
Landowner: Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
Current use: Hospital
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.127 The Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust is confident that their future
operational requirements can be met on the site through redevelopment
and by making more efficient use of land. Some areas of the site will no
longer be required by the Trust and will become available for alternative
uses.


9.128 Many of the current buildings on the Churchill Site are low-quality,
single-storey buildings and floorspace could be increased on the site by
redeveloping these buildings at an appropriate density and scale. Buildings
from the original hospital used during the Second World War have been
retained and these are non-designated heritage assets. They make a
positive contribution in terms of their visual interest and in providing a
historical reference to the interesting history of the site. Their value should
be recognised in future proposals and should be used to inspire and enrich
the identity, character and quality of new development on the site.


9.129 The Plan Strategy focuses hospital related development on the existing
sites in Headington and Marston. Hospital related uses should remain the
main focus of the site. Focussing development on existing sites creates
opportunities for shared trips to the sites which would reduce traffic
movement, provide opportunities to reduce parking on the site and
provide an incentive for improved public transport to the site. This should
remain the aim for any alternative uses developed on the site. Oxfordshire
County Council’s Local Transport Plan seeks to reduce car parking on all the
hospital sites within Oxford but the City Council would need to be satisfied
that any new development would not lead to added parking pressure on
surrounding residential areas.


9.130 It would be beneficial for the hospital if the site were to be developed for
uses where the close proximity of the hospital is important. Employment
uses which have a particular need to be located close to the hospital,
such as pharmaceutical companies needing access to patients for research
purposes, would be suitable. Employer-linked housing that supports the
main uses of the site will also be supported. Complementary uses which
would also be suitable but which should not dominate the new development
on the site are general residential and student accommodation, because
the site is already established for accommodation of those linked to the
hospital, it could also be used for student accommodation that supports
other uses on the site. Retail development should be small scale units so as
they do not act as destination shops.


9.131 The site has a natural, rural edge setting with Boundary Brook and
Warneford Meadow running along the south and west boundaries and
the Lye Valley SSSI adjacent along the south and east boundary. This is an
attractive and important natural setting providing a pleasant contrast with
the large scale and footprint utilitarian buildings of the hospital. There is
an opportunity to better relate the site with its natural setting, improving
access and inter-visibility and linkages, and using the natural setting to
inspire new buildings. Opportunities should also be taken to establish a
more direct and pleasant route within the site to connect Hill Top Road
towards Headington, Wood Farm and Lye Valley.


9.132 This is a large site so its redevelopment will inevitably involve creation of
many new buildings. These should be designed to create active frontages
and to avoid creating large buildings and dead, quiet streets.
9.133 The site is raised up above the golf course, Warneford Meadow, Lye Valley.
Therefore height impact of buildings must be considered from these
surrounding areas.


9.134 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre
Site area: 8.37 hectares/20.68 acres
Ward: Headington
Landowner: Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
Current use: Hospital, medical research, vacant previously developed land
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.135 The Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre is a modern hospital site with 2 or 3 storey
buildings. It has significant roads on two sides (Old Road and Windmill
Road) and adjacent residential development to the north and west. Large
institutional frontages are set back from the roads, with open space mainly
in the centre of the site. There is scope for intensification of the site with
more efficient use of the space, including rationalising car park provision,
better designed and sited open spaces and potentially increased heights.

9.136 The Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust would like to undertake further
improvements to the vacant parts of the site. Hospital related uses should
remain the primary use of the site. Employer-linked housing that supports
the main uses of the site will also be supported. Focussing development
on existing sites creates opportunities for shared trips to the sites which
would reduce traffic movement, provide opportunities to reduce parking
on the site and provide an incentive for improved public transport to the
site. Oxfordshire County Council’s Local Transport Plan seeks to reduce car
parking on all the hospital sites within Oxford.


9.137 A more holistically designed and integrated layout creates a more efficient
use of land and also improves the experience of using the site, especially
for pedestrians. New development should improve pedestrian and cycle
connections into and through the site, better integrating the site into the
surrounding street network and residential areas. Development should
better address the surrounding environment. The mature trees and
greenery fronting Old Road contribute positively to the character of Old
Road and should be retained. The Rock Edge and Lye Valley SSSI’s are
in close proximity to the site. There is high potential for archaeological
interest as Roman remains have been found in the area.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Old Road Campus
Site area: 6.41 hectares/15.84 acres
Ward: Churchill
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Medical research
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.138 The site is home to Oxford University’s Medical Science Division. Opportunities
for further development of this use on this site are supported and would
comply with the strategy of focusing medical research facilities in Headington.
The line of large mature trees and the stone wall along the Old Road boundary
of the site make a positive contribution to the character of Old Road and
should be retained. The green corridor along Boundary Brook should be
maintained and the finger of mature trees and vegetation bisecting the site
downwards from Old Road should be preserved and integrated into any new
development on site. The existing stable, house, and stone wall at corner
of Old Road and Churchill Drive tell a story of the heritage of the site, and
best efforts should be made to retain them in situ and repurpose/integrate
them into new development. Any new development should facilitate views
towards landmark mature trees and green spaces and significant buildings
on the site and in the neighbouring Churchill Hospital site.


9.139 Scope exists for increases in height of development that makes an intensive
and efficient use of the remaining land on the site; the existing context of built
form on site and large tall trees surrounding the boundary helps to mitigate
potential impacts of height and softens the transition to neighbouring areas.


9.140 The site is close to a large area of Roman occupation so there is a high
potential for archaeological interest within the site.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Warneford Hospital, Warneford Lane
Site area: 8.78 hectares/21.7 acres
Ward: Churchill
Landowner: Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust
Current use: Hospital, research, playing fields
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.141 The buildings on the site are used by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust
but they are in need of major refurbishment or redevelopment to comply
with modern NHS standards. Replacement of the non-listed buildings on
the site will be considered as part of any scheme but the listed buildings
should be retained. Development opportunities are also constrained by
the need to protect the landscaped grounds in front of the main hospital
buildings, trees on site and the amenity of neighbouring residential
properties. The site does not include Warneford Meadow which is a
registered Town Green.


9.142 The landowner would like to relocate hospital facilities into new buildings
on the playing fields. The loss of the sports facility is considered justified
only due to the need for and benefits of new hospital development. The
playing fields should be re-provided or a contribution made to another
facility. The landowner may not require all the playing fields for hospital
use. Being an existing campus site of Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust,
the site would also be suitable for employer-linked housing or student
accommodation.


9.143 Development should be designed to enhance the listed buildings and
their setting, Warneford Meadow and the mature trees and parkland
setting. Views across and through the site of the historic buildings and
of mature trees towards South Park, Old Road and the Churchill Hospital
should be retained. Because of the character of the historic buildings and
parkland and the semi-rural setting, development of 3-4 storeys is likely
to be appropriate, subject to careful massing. Lower buildings heights to
transition with the meadow to the south would help to retain the tranquil
feel of the orchard and meadow. Opportunity to draw a green link from
Warneford Meadow into the site should also be considered to assist with
biodiversity and legibility.


9.144 Both the water supply network capacity and the sewerage network capacity
in this area are unlikely to be able to support the demand anticipated
from this development. Investigations by Thames Water, funded by the
applicant, will be necessary to determine whether upgrades to the water
supply capacity and sewerage networks are required. Up to three years
lead in time could be required to undertake any such works.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Sites Released from Green Belt


9.145 The following sites are in Green Belt currently, although the Green Belt
Review as part of the Local Plan proposes their removal (as well as the
removal of the land at St Catherine’s College, which is shown on the
Polices Map as site SP66, but which does not have a detailed site allocation
policy because development of the site has largely happened as only minor
elements are proposed. Furthermore, the site is small and separated from
the rest of the Green Belt by a wall and the removal from Green Belt is
intended to formalise the existing situation.

Marston Paddock
Site area: 0.78 hectares/ 1.93 acres
Ward: Marston
Landowner: Aubrey-Fletcher
Current use: Paddock Land
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.146 The site is comprised of a single pasture field with a few trees and shrubs
and well-treed hedgerows to the east and north. The current urban edge
is defined by the residential park home site to the north. The site is a
contained fl at site with mature trees and hedgerows to the north east of
the site.


9.147 The Green Belt Study (LUC 2017) found that the A40 represents a strong
barrier between the site and the wider countryside to the east and north
and the open fields to the south/south-east have a degree of separation
from the wider countryside.


9.148 The site is on the edge of Marston village adjacent to existing residential and
the Old Marston Conservation Area. Low density residential development
is considered to be possible without harm to the Conservation Area.
Careful design will be needed in order to ensure that the setting of the
Conservation Area is conserved and enhanced. 10% of the site will be
required for new public open space which should be sited to make existing
residents feel welcome to use it.


9.149 Access to the site is via Butts Lane and Church Lane, which are of single
carriageway width. Proposals for the development of this site would need
to demonstrate that access arrangements would not be detrimental to
highway safety.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

St Frideswide Farm
Site area: 3.95 hectares/ 9.76 acres
Ward: Wolvercote
Landowner: Croudace Homes/Christ Church
Current use: Arable farmland
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.150 The site comprises mainly arable farmland. It is adjacent to the urban edge
of Oxford, with fenced and lit tennis courts and hockey pitches to the
south and some housing and the A4165 to the west. It lies on ground that
slopes gently downhill towards the river Cherwell in the east and is visually
part of extensive farmland to the north and east.


9.151 The Green Belt Study (LUC, 2017) assessed the potential release of the site
from Green Belt as having a moderate impact on the overall purposes of
the Green Belt. To compensate for the loss of Green Belt, connectivity and
enhancements to surrounding sports and recreation and public rights of
way should be implemented.


9.152 Land to the north and east of the site has been proposed as a strategic
housing site by Cherwell District Council. This would mean that the new
Green Belt boundary will be beyond the strategic housing site. Development
within St Frideswide Farm should take place with regard to the potential
development site to the north, within Cherwell District Council.


9.153 The site does not have any biodiversity protections, but the ecological
value of the site must be assessed as part of a planning application and any
harm avoided, mitigated or compensated for. The hedgerows should be
retained as part of the design where possible and to the east a hedgerow
boundary with native trees should be established to create a boundary
with the remaining Green Belt. 10% of the site will be required for new
public open space which should be sited to make existing residents feel
welcome to use it.


9.154 Access to the site would need to be taken from the A4165 Oxford Road.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Hill View Farm
Site area: 3.52 hectares/ 8.7 acres
Ward: Marston
Landowner: M K Dogar Limited
Current use: Greenbelt agricultural buildings
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.155 The site is comprised of hedged farmland and riverside meadow with some
farm buildings, trees and shrubs and some mown areas. The site adjoins
the defined urban edge at its south-eastern corner, on Mill Lane, next to
Hill View Farm house and an associated property, which are in the Green
Belt but outside of the site. The A40 Northern Bypass defines the northeastern
edge of the site.


9.156 There is a slight detachment between the site and the existing urban
settlement edge, as allotments form the northern tip of the defined urban
area. However the buildings to the south of the allotments, the Bradlands
development, are prominent three-storey flats, so there is no significant
separation between Marston and the site. The sense of separation from
the urban edge gradually increases with distance from it. The openness
of the Cherwell Valley, penetrating into the heart of Oxford, makes an
important contribution to the City’s historic setting and special character,
but this parcel is peripheral within that area. The river itself meanders
westwards along the edge of Sunnymead, so the parcel is some distance
from the valley floor floodplain, but the north-south orientation of the
river to the south means that high buildings would still encroach on the
perceived openness of the valley.


9.157 The site is adjacent to the Old Marston Conservation Area. Careful design
will be needed in order to ensure that the setting of the Conservation
Area is conserved and enhanced. Development must be sensitive to both
the Green Belt and the character of the Old Marston Conservation area.
Relatively low-density and low height residential development will be
required.


9.158 The site does not have any biodiversity protections, but the ecological value
of the site must be assessed as part of a planning application and any harm
avoided, mitigated or compensated for. The hedgerows should be retained
as part of the design where possible. 10% of the site will be required for
new public open space which should be sited to make existing residents
feel welcome to use it.


9.159 Access to the site will need to be taken from Mill Lane and localised
improvements will be required in order to demonstrate that two vehicles
can pass each other along the duration of Mill Lane.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Land West of Mill Lane
Site area: 1.99 hectares/ 4.92 acres
Ward: Marston
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: Greenbelt agricultural land
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.160 This flat agricultural site is surrounded by mature hedgerow. It forms part
of the rural edge to Old Marston.


9.161 The site is in close proximity to the Conservation Area. Consideration should
be given to the setting of the village. The development of sites along the
northern edge will coalesce with A40 and create a new urban edge to the
city and village. An access road from A40 already exists and there may be
opportunities to create a cluster of sites around this if adequate separation
from the village can be achieved to protect its character and setting.


9.162 Release of 112b-1 in isolation was assessed by the Green Belt study as
having moderate harm to the Green Belt. Development of this parcel
would not represent a significant expansion of the urban form and the
parcel does not represent a significant proportion of the settlement gap
between Marston and Sunnymead. Although the Cherwell Valley makes
an important contribution to the city’s historic setting and special character,
this site is peripheral within that area. The A40 also limits the relationship
of this site with the wider countryside.

9.163 The site does not have any biodiversity protections, but the ecological value
of the site must be assessed as part of a planning application and any harm
avoided, mitigated or compensated for. The hedgerows should be retained
as part of the design where possible. 10% of the site will be required for
new public open space which should be sited to make existing residents
feel welcome to use it.


9.164 There are currently two points of access to the site from Mill Lane. Localised
improvements are likely to be required to Mill Lane in order to demonstrate
that two vehicles can pass each other along the duration of Mill Lane.


9.165 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the new
development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be required.
As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended to ensure that
the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Park Farm
Site area: 1.56 hectares/ 3.85 acres
Ward: Marston
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Green open space
Flood Zone: FZ3b but FZ3a for sequential test


9.166 The site comprises of a pasture field and a small area of hardstanding
contained by a dense conifer line. Hedges line Hertford College Recreation
Ground to the north and a pasture field to the south. It is located between
the urban edge of New Marston and the buildings of Park Farm


9.167 Development of the site would create an area of development beyond a
consistent boundary line. The impact on the wider Green Belt is limited
because of the relatively small size of the site and because development
would not encroach closer to the river. Careful design is required to minimise
impacts on the Green Belt. The site is suitable for housing development set
carefully within the landscape. Consideration should be given in design to
the impact on views from Headington.


9.168 The site does not have any biodiversity protections, but the ecological value
of the site must be assessed as part of a planning application and any harm
avoided, mitigated or compensated for. It is also within 200m of the New
Marston Meadows SSSI, which is sensitive to changes in the flows and
quality of water in the river Cherwell due to being in its floodplain. There
have been issues previously with sewage leakages; therefore the network
capacity needs to be considered. The existing hedgerows and trees on the
site should be retained as part of the design where possible. 10% of the
site will be required for new public open space which should be sited to
make existing residents feel welcome to use it.


9.169 The site is currently accessed via a private road leading from Edgeway
Road, which will require localised widening in order to accommodate the
development. Consideration will also need to be given to the Marston Cycle
Path which runs along the site’s eastern boundary providing a connection
between Marston and the city centre via University Parks.


9.170 Residential development at this site in Flood Zone 3a has been justified
through the sequential test. A Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment was
carried out for this site to examine part b) of the Exception Test (which
relates to whether the development is safe). The Level 2 SFRA considered
the proposed development was appropriate and additional mitigation and/
or analysis may be required to demonstrate compliance with the Exception
Test at the planning application stage. This is to be undertaken through
a site-specific FRA supporting the planning application. The site specific
flood risk assessment must demonstrate how the development will be safe
otherwise planning permission will not be granted.


9.171 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that
the new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network
are likely to be required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network
is recommended to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes
place to support development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Pear Tree Farm
Site area: 2.01 hectares/ 4.97 acres
Ward: Wolvercote
Landowner: Merton College
Current use: Agriculture
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.172 The site contains the buildings of Pear Tree Farm, adjacent mobile phone
mast and fi elds. It is contained to the east by the railway line and associated
vegetation and to the southwest by a belt of trees marking the route of a
former railway line and the urban edge. The contained character of the site
and the amount of development within it already limit the extent to which
any development would be perceived as sprawl and the perception of the
site as part of the gap between Oxford and Kidlington.


9.173 The land to the north lies in Cherwell and is safeguarded for potential
future development. Development of the Pear Tree Farm site should allow
for future connectivity with any development of the site in Cherwell, which
should give potential for vehicular, pedestrian and cycle links.


9.174 The site does not have any biodiversity protections, but the ecological value
of the site must be assessed as part of a planning application and any harm
avoided, mitigated or compensated for. 10% of the site will be required for
new public open space which should be sited to make existing residents
feel welcome to use it.


9.175 Access to the site could be achieved via the adjacent land to the north,
over which Merton College has rights of access.


9.176 The sewerage network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether
upgrades to the sewerage network are required. Up to three years lead in
time could be required to undertake any such works.


9.177 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Land East of Redbridge Park & Ride
Site area: 3.64 hectares/ 8.99 acres
Ward: Hinksey Park
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: Greenbelt agricultural land
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.178 The site comprises meadow land used for grazing. It has a soft, green
riverside edge that borders Weirs Mill stream, a tributary of the Thames
that runs along the eastern edge of the site. This edge planting should be
retained, as should views through the site to it.


9.179 The Abingdon and Southern By-Pass roads create considerable noise
which would need to be ameliorated through careful design and siting
of housing. There is a broken planting screen at present which should be
reinforced whilst retaining the views through the site to the landscape
beyond. Any development could be medium/high density but the height
should retain views, giving consideration to the views from Hinksey Hill.


9.180 The site does not have any biodiversity protections, but the ecological
value of the site must be assessed as part of a planning application and any
harm avoided, mitigated or compensated for. Consideration should also
be given to the location within 200m of the Iffley Meadows SSSI, which
is sensitive to changes in the flows and quality of water in the two arms
of the river Thames due to being in its fl oodplain. 10% of the site will be
required for new public open space which should be sited to make existing
residents feel welcome to use it.


9.181 Weirs Mill Stream is one of the few locations in the city with potential
for new residential moorings. These should be provided as part of the
development, with access through the site to the bankside and necessary
servicing provided.


9.182 Vehicular access to the site would be from Abingdon Road and may require
either a connection into the existing signalised junction of Abingdon Road/
Old Abingdon Road or a connection into the existing traffic signals for the
buses accessing the Redbridge Park and Ride site opposite. Two points of
access would also be required for pedestrians and cyclists: one to the west
connecting with the bus stops at Park and Ride site; and the other to the
north connecting with existing bus stops on Abingdon Road. The existing
cycle track that runs along the western boundary should be retained.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

St Catherine’s College Land
Site area: 0.61 hectares/1.51 acres
Ward: Holywell
Landowner: St Catherine’s College
Current use: Academic Institutional
Flood Zone: FZ3b but FZ1 for sequential test


9.183 The site is visually separated for the wider Green Belt by a wall. Some of the
Green Belt area has already been developed and there is a small remaining
parcel of undeveloped land. Development could take place without harm
to the integrity and purpose of the Green Belt. The site is within the central
conservation area and in close proximity to listed buildings, and development
must be designed carefully to preserve and enhance their character.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Other sites


Banbury Road University Sites
Site area: 1.95 hectares/4.81 acres (Plot A)
0.52 hectares/1.28 acres (Plot B)
0.64 hectare/1.58 acres (Plot C)
Ward: North
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Non- residential institution, staff housing,
student accommodation
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.184 This site comprises three separate plots close to each other, in two distinct
areas. They are currently in academic use. Plot A includes some staff housing
and student accommodation. There is high potential for prehistoric and
Roman archaeological interest.

9.185 Many of the buildings contribute to the character of the North Oxford
Victorian Suburb conservation area or are listed. The two areas to the north
are historically part of the late C19/early C20 development of North Oxford
by St John’s College and retain evidence of the planned “setting out” of
this part of the city at that time with large detached or semi-detached villas
set back from the street behind boundary walls and the remains of front
gardens. The area to the south sits immediately to the north of the grade II*
listed The Old Parsonage. The pair of late C19 villas that front Banbury Road
are listed and form an important group up to and including No 21 Banbury
Road. They would need to be retained in any future development proposal.


9.186 Any major redevelopment is unlikely to be suitable but there is some
potential to intensify the existing use whilst respecting both plot patterns
and boundary treatments. Development should be of a scale that respects
the surrounding buildings.


9.187 Further academic uses on the site would help focus these uses onto
existing sites in line with the strategy. Plots A and C lie within an area with
potentially high groundwater.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Bertie Place Recreation Ground and Land Behind Wytham Street
Site area: 0.66 hectares/1.63 acres (Plot A)
2.60 hectares/6.42 acres (Plot B)
Ward: Hinksey Park
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: Recreation Ground and vacant land
Flood Zone: FZ3a for sequential test (for whole site)


9.188 This site is comprised of two separate plots. Plot A is a public recreation
ground and Plot B is overgrown land formerly used for landfill. Plot A is
suitable for a new primary school if one is required. It is also suitable for
residential development. Plot B is suitable only for a replacement recreation
ground and school playing fields.


9.191 Vehicular access to Plot A must be taken via Bertie Place and a suitable
turning head must be provided within the development.. Pedestrian access
to the site should be provided from Bertie Place, from the pathway at
the northern end of the site off Wytham Street, and from the alleyway
between 378 and 380 Abingdon Road. The National Cycle Network Route
5 currently passes through the site and development proposals should
either provide for its retention or replacement by a suitable alternative
route. The new recreation ground on Plot B should include the provision of
pedestrian links from both Bertie Place and Wytham Street via John Towle
Close.


9.192 There is potential for there to be slow worms on the site. These are
protected species, although their habitats are not, and if found they can be
relocated to alternative sites. Slow worm sites should not be isolated from
other potential wildlife corridors so, if they are able to be retained on site,
a buffer should be retained along the river and railway corridors. The Iffley
Meadows SSSI is located within 600m of the site to the East. It is sensitive
to changes in the flows and quality of water in the two arms of the river
Thames due to being in its floodplain, and as such it can be impacted by
contamination through surface water runoffs.


9.193 Residential development at this site in Flood Zone 3a has been justified
through the sequential test. A Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment was
carried out for this site to examine part b) of the Exception Test (which
relates to whether the development is safe). The Level 2 SFRA considered
the proposed development was appropriate and additional mitigation and/
or analysis may be required to demonstrate compliance with the Exception
Test at the planning application stage. This is to be undertaken through
a site-specific FRA supporting the planning application. The site specific
flood risk assessment must demonstrate how the development will be safe
otherwise planning permission will not be granted.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Canalside Land, Jericho
Site area: 0.49 hectares/1.21 acres
Ward: Jericho and Osney
Landowner: Administrators, Oxford City Council, British Waterways,
Church of England
Current use: Part boat hire base, garages, open space, derelict workshops,
boat repair yard
Flood Zone: FZ3b but FZ3a for sequential test


9.194 This former boatyard and workshop site has been vacant and derelict since
2006. Part of the site to the north is still used by a boat hire facility while
garages and open space occupy the land owned by the City Council. The
site is in a sensitive area within the Jericho conservation area and adjacent
to the Grade 1 listed St Barnabas Church.


9.195 Having been the previous site for a boatyard, and with the capacity to
accommodate it, this site is considered suitable to replace these facilities.
The operating boatyard should include a wet dock, and allow craneage for
narrowboats with possible supporting chandlery and associated workshop
facilities. Other uses that should be provided on the site are residential, a
sustainablysized community centre, a public open space or square and a
new bridge over the canal for pedestrians and cyclists. The canal hire base
at the northern part of the site should be retained.


9.196 Building heights should reflect the form and scale of surrounding
development, particularly surrounding the area of public open space and
should not exceed 3 storeys. Finished design should respect the waterfront
heritage of the site, the conservation area and Grade 1 Listed Building.
Potentially the wall separating the Church and the proposed new square
can be demolished to open up the square and views of the Grade 1 listed
building.


9.197 Residential development at this site in Flood Zone 3a has been justified
through the sequential test. A Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment was
carried out for this site to examine part b) of the Exception Test (which
relates to whether the development is safe). The Level 2 SFRA considered
the proposed development was appropriate and additional mitigation and/
or analysis may be required to demonstrate compliance with the Exception
Test at the planning application stage. This is to be undertaken through
a site-specific FRA supporting the planning application. The site specific
flood risk assessment must demonstrate how the development will be safe
otherwise planning permission will not be granted.


9.198 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Court Place Gardens, Iffley Village
Site area: 3.89 hectares/9.61acres
Ward: Rose Hill and Iffley
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: University of Oxford graduate housing
Flood Zone: FZ3b but FZ3a for sequential test


9.199 This site is currently poor quality graduate student accommodation. There
is a listed building on the site and the existing development does not
enhance the setting of the listed building or the conservation area. The
west side of the site is open space with dense tree coverage and should
not be developed.


9.200 There is potential to make better use of the site whilst respecting and
improving the setting of the listed building. The existing graduate student
accommodation should be replaced with new graduate accommodation
or with residential or a mix of both uses. The site is not within an area that
satisfies the student accommodation Policy HP4 so there should be no net
increase in students living on the site. Opportunities should be explored
to open up footpaths for pedestrians through the site. More vulnerable
development will be expected to be directed away from the portion of the
site within Flood Zone 3b. The site is almost directly adjacent to the Iffley
Meadows SSSI, which is sensitive to changes in water quality and surface
water flows due to its location within a floodplain.


9.201 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that
the new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network
are likely to be required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network
is recommended to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes
place to support development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Cowley Marsh Depot, Marsh Road
Site area: 1.70 hectares/4.20 acres
Ward: Cowley Marsh
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: City works depot
Flood Zone: FZ3b but FZ1 for sequential test

9.202 The site is currently in use as a depot by the City Council, which is
likely to relocate. Due to the bulk and nature of the existing depot, the
redevelopment of the site should help improve the setting of Cowley Marsh
Recreation Ground, provided that it is well designed, and is likely to lead to
a reduction in vehicle movements. The site is suitable for residential.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Faculty of Music, St Aldates
Site area: 0.32 hectares/0.79 acres
Ward: Holywell
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Academic institutional
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.203 The site is currently occupied by the University of Oxford’s Faculty of Music
which is due to be relocated to the Radcliffe Observatory Quarter site.
The current Faculty of Music site is a sensitive location as it backs onto
Christ Church meadow, is in a Conservation area and is close to the listed
buildings of Christ Church College. Care will be needed in design in order to
demonstrate that the setting of the listed buildings and Conservation Area
are conserved and enhanced. There is a high potential for archaeological
interest such as the site of the Crutched Friars.


9.204 The site is situated on St Aldate’s and is unlikely to be suitable for uses that
require parking or generate much traffic. Continuing the academic use of
the site would be most appropriate and the incorporation of some student
accommodation in this city centre site would be suitable.


9.205 Residential use within this site in Flood Zone 3a has been justified through
the sequential test although policies in the Core Strategy relating to
development in the flood plain will also need to be complied with.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Former Barns Road East Allotments
Site area: 0.5 hectares/ 1.24 acres
Ward: Cowley
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: Disused allotments/garden area
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.206 The site is comprised of disused allotments, with some trees and shrubs
and some mown areas. There is currently no vehicular access to the site
with pedestrian and cycle access achievable via Kersington Crescent to the
north. To the south of the site there is a cycle track which can be accessed
via Barns Road. Access to the site could be achieved with the demolition
and reconfiguration of the layout of one of the existing blocks of flats on
Kersington Crescent.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Former Iffley Mead Playing Fields
Site area: 2.04 hectares/ 5.04 acres
Ward: Rose Hill and Iffley
Landowner: Oxfordshire County Council
Current use: Former School Playing Field
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.207 The former Iffley Meads Playing Fields were once part of St Augustine School.
The adjacent school is now the Iffley Academy, which uses the adjacent
playing fields, but not the Former Iffley Mead Playing Fields site. The site is
currently and has been for many years a disused, fenced off grassed area. The
site is in a largely residential area and is suitable for residential development.
The site could be used for employer-linked housing, as long as it is the only
County Council site brought forward for this use.


9.208 Further evidence is required on whether the site is surplus to recreational/
sports requirements and school requirements. There is need to negotiate
access via adjoining land, as access to site is currently via school which is
accessed via Augustine Way.


9.209 A minimum of 10% of the site should be for public open space which
should be accessible for existing residents. It is likely that this space will
be best provided as an extension to Donnington Recreation Ground. The
development should be designed to ensure active frontages face onto
the open space. The site does not have any biodiversity protections, but
the ecological value of the site must be assessed as part of a planning
application and any harm avoided, mitigated or compensated for.


9.210 The site is currently accessed via the Iffley Academy School situated off
Augustine Way. Any redevelopment of the site would need to ensure that
access to the site can be achieved without being detrimental to the school.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Grandpont Car Park
Site area: 0.44 hectares/ 1.09 acres
Ward: Hinksey Park
Landowner: Oxfordshire County Council
Current use: County council ground level parking
Flood Zone: FZ2


9.211 The site comprises of a surface-level car park used as a remote car park by
County Council staff. It is a narrow, linear site screened on all sides by tall
trees. The site is in a largely residential area and is suitable for residential
development. The site could be used for employer-linked housing, as long
as it is the only County Council site brought forward for this use. The
development must be designed with consideration to the rural and open
character of the publicly valuable and accessible open space to the north.
Tree screening should be retained as far as possible.


9.212 Access would need to be through the existing relatively narrow street
network. As the site is used currently as a car park, development of the site
is likely to lead to a reduction in vehicular access movements.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Jesus College Sports Ground, Herbert Close
Site area: 0.55 hectares/1.36 acres
Ward: Cowley Marsh
Landowner: Jesus College
Current use: Private sports pitch
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.213 This site is private open space currently an open, grassed field occupied
by a number of sports pitches with small ancillary structures associated
with the sports activities. The site is to the south east of Bartlemas Close,
which is a historic lane. A hedgerow provides a distinct break both physical
and visual between the settlement of Bartlemas and the wider Bartlemas
conservation area and the site.


9.214 Views of and from Bartlemas are restricted due to vegetation and buildings;
however development of the site would inevitably have some impact on
the sense of rural isolation that the current undeveloped playing fields
reinforce. Therefore, any development would need to be designed with
buildings of form, massing (roof profiles) height and façade materials that
allow the built forms to recede in the backdrop to views from and across
Bartlemas. In addition, landscape design would need to be a fundamental
consideration at the earliest design stage, to enhance the contribution that
existing trees and hedgerows make to the rural setting of the Bartlemas
settlement, listed buildings and the conservation area. Development
should result in enhancement of the hedgerow along the southern side of
the lane.


9.215 In the light of Policy H8’s approach to locating student accommodation,
the site is not suitable for student accommodation as it is not directly
adjacent to a main thoroughfare, within the city centre or a district centre
or on an existing teaching campus. Residential development would be an
appropriate use on this site. The loss of the sports facility is considered
justified because of the need for and benefits of new housing. Public sports
facilities should be reprovided or facilities nearby improved to increase
capacity to match that which has been lost.


9.216 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

John Radcliffe Hospital Site
Site area: 27.75 hectares/68.57 acres
Ward: Headington
Landowner: Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
Current use: Hospital
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.217 The Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust is confident that their future
operational requirements can be met on the site through redevelopment
and by making more efficient use of land. Some areas of the site will no
longer be required by the Trust for hospital uses and will become available
for alternative uses. Proposals must consider their impact upon the Old
Headington Conservation Area.


9.218 The Core Strategy focuses hospital related development on the existing
sites in Headington and Marston. Hospital related uses should remain the
main focus of the site. Focussing development on existing sites creates
opportunities for shared trips to the sites which would reduce traffic
movement, provide opportunities to reduce parking on the site and
provide an incentive for improved public transport to the site. This should
remain the aim for any alternative uses developed on the site. Oxfordshire
County Council’s Local Transport Plan seeks to reduce car parking on all the
hospital sites within Oxford.


9.219 It would be beneficial for the hospital if the site was developed for uses
where the proximity of being adjacent to the hospital is important.
Employment uses which have a particular need to be located close to the
hospital, such as pharmaceutical companies needing access to patients
for research purposes, would be suitable. It would also be beneficial to
locate primary healthcare and a patient hotel on the site. Employer-linked
housing that supports the main uses of the site will also be supported.
Complementary uses which would also be suitable but which should not
dominate the new development on the site are general residential and
student accommodation. Retail development should be small scale units
so as to not act as destination shops.


9.220 This site is within an area where development is likely to exacerbate surface
and/or foul water flooding. There is an opportunity to address excess of
runoff at the John Radcliffe Hospital site by ensuring that any development
at the site reduces rather than maintains existing levels. This could take the
form of ponds, wetlands or an on-site attenuation feature.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Land at Meadow Lane
Site area: 0.989 hectares/2.443 acres
Ward: Iffl ey Fields
Landowner: Donnington Health Trust
Current use: Grassland/pony paddock
Flood Zone: FZ3b

9.221 The site comprises of land used for horse grazing, with some trees and
shrubs. The site sits within the Iffley village envelope and has potential for
some sensitive housing infill. This should conserve and enhance the unique
characteristics and appearance of the Iffley conservation area. The building
line should be followed on the frontage and the semi-rural frontage on
Church Way should be retained, as well as the stone wall boundary and
trees, particularly at Church Way. Development should be relatively low-density
and two-storey with front and rear gardens and stone-walled
boundaries. The impact of development on views through the riverside
edge landscape of the Cherwell meadows to the west, and views back to
Iffley from the west should be considered.


9.222 Access to the site can be achieved from Church Way or Meadow Lane. There
is an existing field gate access to the site from Church Way. A biodiversity
survey has found that the site does not meet the criteria for an Oxford
City Wildlife Site. However, the biodiversity value of the site and impact of
development understood, avoided and mitigated or compensated for.


9.223 Residential development at this site in Flood Zone 3a has been justified
through the sequential test. A Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment was
carried out for this site to examine part b) of the Exception Test (which
relates to whether the development is safe). The Level 2 SFRA considered
the proposed development was appropriate and additional mitigation and/
or analysis may be required to demonstrate compliance with the Exception
Test at the planning application stage. This is to be undertaken through
a site-specific FRA supporting the planning application. The site specific
flood risk assessment must demonstrate how the development will be safe
otherwise planning permission will not be granted.


9.224 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Lincoln College Sports Ground, Bartlemas Close
Site area: 2.34 hectares/5.78 acres
Ward: Cowley Marsh
Landowner: Lincoln College
Current use: Private sports pitch
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.225 The site is currently private open air sports facilities for Lincoln College who
consider it surplus to requirements as they plan to share the pitch of Jesus
College to the north. The site has limited access to outside groups on an
ad hoc basis. The site lies off the north-eastern side of Cowley Road to the
north east of a suburban housing block that sits between Bartlemas Close,
Belvedere Road, Kenilworth Avenue and Barracks Lane.


9.226 Residential development would be an appropriate use on this site. The
loss of the majority of the sports facility is considered justified because
of the need for and benefits of new housing. Sports provision must be
retained unless an alternative provision is made or contributions are made
to improving a local facility such that its capacity increase replaces what is
lost. If an alternative site is found then 10% of the site will be required for
new public open space which should be sited to make existing residents
feel welcome to use it.


9.227 Any development should be designed with buildings of form, massing
(roof profiles) height and façade materials that allow the built forms to
recede in the backdrop to views from and across Bartlemas. In addition,
landscape design would need to be a fundamental consideration at the
earliest design stage, to enhance the contribution that existing trees
and hedgerows make to the rural setting of the Bartlemas settlement,
listed buildings and the conservation area. Development should result in
enhancement of the hedgerow along the southern side of the lane.


9.228 The treatment of landscape at the perimeter of the sites must be given
consideration where the impact on the setting of Bartlemas and on the
setting of the listed buildings within the settlement must be an important
consideration in the design process.


9.229 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development. Any investigations required are to be funded by the applicant.


9.230 Sewerage network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether
an upgrade to the sewerage network is required. Up to three years lead in
time could be required to undertake any such works.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Littlemore Park, Armstrong Road
Site area: 5.44 hectares/13.44 acres
Ward: Littlemore
Landowner: Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
Current use: Vacant previously developed land
Flood Zone: FZ3b but FZ1 for sequential test


9.231 The site is within a predominantly employment area close to Littlemore and
Sandford-on-Thames and is accessed off Armstrong Road. There are some
trees on the west end of the site.


9.232 The Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust would like to focus employment
that is linked to the hospitals, such as pharmaceutical research, onto
hospital sites, in particular the Churchill Hospital site. The policy for the
Churchill Hospital site (SP9) and the John Radcliffe Hospital (SP24) includes
provision for employment to facilitate this relocation. If this could be
achieved, the Littlemore Park site would be most suitable to delivering
new residential development.


9.233 The site is adjacent to listed hospital buildings so the impact on these
buildings and their setting must be considered. The existing ecological
provision on the site must be understood and enhanced. Landscaping
should consider the brook to the south of the site. The former playing field
should be relocated or facilities improved elsewhere. Because of the listed
buildings and importance of landscape to their setting, development of
medium density and height is likely to be suitable.

9.234 The site does not have any biodiversity protections, but the ecological value
of the site must be assessed as part of a planning application and any harm
avoided, mitigated or compensated for.


9.235 A pedestrian and cycle route across the site, as indicated on the Proposals
Map, should be included as part of any development on the site. Residential
development would be very segregated from neighbouring communities
so adequate pedestrian and cycle links must be incorporated. These should
consider access to the railway and connectivity to the business park site
to the south, and to the village. More vulnerable development will be
expected to be directed away from Flood Zone 3b.


9.236 Residential development at this site in Flood Zone 3a has been justified
through the sequential test. A Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment was
carried out for this site to examine part b) of the Exception Test (which
relates to whether the development is safe). The Level 2 SFRA considered
the proposed development was appropriate and additional mitigation and/
or analysis may be required to demonstrate compliance with the Exception
Test at the planning application stage. This is to be undertaken through
a site-specific FRA supporting the planning application. The site specific
flood risk assessment must demonstrate how the development will be safe
otherwise planning permission will not be granted.


9.237 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that
the new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network
are likely to be required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network
is recommended to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes
place to support development. Any investigations required are to be
funded by the applicant.


9.238 Sewerage network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether
an upgrade to the sewerage network is required. Up to three years lead in
time could be required to undertake any such works.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Manor Place
Site area: 1.24 hectares/3.06 acres
Ward: Holywell
Landowner: Merton College
Current use: Vacant former tennis courts, allotments and orchard
Flood Zone: FZ2 but FZ1 for sequential test


9.239 This site consists of a mix of disused hard and grass tennis courts, abandoned
private allotments and an orchard. It is a sensitive site as it is close to a
number of listed buildings, the Holywell Cemetery and within the Central
Conservation Area with a number of large trees on site. Any development
would need to ensure that there was no adverse impact upon the setting
of the listed buildings and the Central conservation area. There is high
potential for archaeological interest on the site with Civil War defences
having been excavated previously.


9.240 The most appropriate vehicular access would be to widen and extend the
existing pedestrian and cycle access from Manor Place to the north of the
site, incorporating land in Merton College’s ownership. Access via Holywell
Mill Lane to the south is unlikely to be deliverable as it is not under the
control of Merton College and the visibility at the junction with St Cross
Road is substandard.


9.241 In order to minimise traffic movements, the most appropriate uses for the
site are either student accommodation or car free residential. The loss of
the former sports facility is considered justified only due to the need for
and benefits of new housing or student accommodation.


9.242 Residential use of the site in Flood Zone 3a has been justified through the
sequential test. The site satisfied all but one part of the Exception Test (relating
to reducing overall flood risk) but this remaining part would be difficult to
fulfil until the proposed development is designed. A site specific flood risk
assessment is needed before the criterion for residential use can be firmly
satisfied. The site is also within 200m of the New Marston Meadows SSSI,
which is sensitive to changes in the flows and quality of water in the river
Cherwell due to being in its floodplain. There have been issues previously with
sewage leakages; therefore the network capacity needs to be considered.


9.243 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that
the new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network
are likely to be required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network
is recommended to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes
place to support development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Manzil Way Resource Centre
Site area: 0.75 hectares/ 1.85 acres
Ward: St Clement’s
Landowner: Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust
Current use: Healthcare, offices, restaurant/café and flats
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.244 The site comprises of low-rise buildings, with car parking and small areas
of grass and trees. The site is used for adult mental health therapy activity
and associated administration. The Oxford Health NHS Trust’s ongoing
review of healthcare facilities might find that this site is needed, but it
is more likely that additional need will be incorporated into Warneford
or Littlemore sites, which have capacity. This site is a suitable site for a
healthcare facility or for residential development. This site is one of only
a few sites owned by the Oxford Health NHS Trust, and also presents an
opportunity for them to develop employer-linked housing on the site.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Nielsen, London Road
Site area: 4.84 hectares/11.96 acres
Ward: Quarry and Risinghurst
Landowner: Shaviram Group
Current use: Employment (B1)
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.245 This site contains an office development which only occupies a small
proportion of the site. There is an opportunity to use this site more
efficiently by introducing further development. Residential would be the
most appropriate. The frontage onto the A40 could create a landmark as a
gateway into the city.


9.246 As a Category 2 Employment site, any redevelopment would be expected
to retain or increase the existing level of employment (employees) on site.
This could be achieved by a replacement employment generating use. Small
scale employment units, whilst potentially having a lower employee density
than the existing use, would create a greater range of job opportunities in
line with the Core Strategy.


9.247 Sewerage network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether
an upgrade to the sewerage network is required. Up to three years lead in
time could be required to undertake any such works.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Old Power Station
Site area: 0.32 hectares/0.79 acres
Ward: Holywell
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Mainly storage
Flood Zone: FZ3b


9.248 This site consists of an old power station which is owned and occupied
by the University of Oxford, used currently mainly for storage. The site
is suitable for student accommodation and housing, including employer-linked
housing, or for intensification of its current academic use. The site
is on the Oxford Heritage Asset Register. The power station was built at
Cannon Wharf in 1892 for the Oxford Electric Company Ltd, with coal
and cooling water supplied by the river. It continued in operation as the
city’s main source of electricity until 1969. The building illustrates the
development of West Oxford as an industrial suburb with large industrial
building set amongst the narrow streets of housing that continued to be
built up to the end of the 19th century. Development should reflect the
heritage interest of the site.

9.249 The site is directly adjacent to the boundary of the Osney Island Conservation
area, which derives its unique character from the well preserved Victorian
buildings that have had limited 20th Century intervention. Any proposals
should have regard to this setting and to the visual impact development
this site would have on the character of the area.


9.250 Residential development at this site in Flood Zone 3a has been justified
through the sequential test. A Level 2 Strategic Flood Risk Assessment was
carried out for this site to examine part b) of the Exception Test (which
relates to whether the development is safe). The Level 2 SFRA considered
the proposed development was appropriate and additional mitigation and/
or analysis may be required to demonstrate compliance with the Exception
Test at the planning application stage. This is to be undertaken through
a site-specific FRA supporting the planning application. The site specific
flood risk assessment must demonstrate how the development will be safe
otherwise planning permission will not be granted.


9.251 The allocation proposes development including residential, (this is more
vulnerable use based on the flood vulnerability classification). Care should
therefore be taken when deciding where best to locate different elements
of the development. In view of the flood risk issues at the site, ground
raising may be required to raise certain parts of the site.


9.252 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Oriel College Land at King Edward Street and High Street
Site area: 0.26 hectares/0.64 acres
Ward: Holywell
Landowner: Oriel College
Current use: Mix of A1, A2, A3, A4, B1 and C2 uses
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.253 This site consists of a number of properties including a listed building. As
a city centre location, the site is suitable for a number of uses although
with the ground floor designated as a mix of primary, secondary and street
specific frontages, Class A uses should be maintained here subject to Local
Plan policies. Any development would need to ensure that there was no
adverse impact upon the setting of the listed building and conservation area.


9.254 The site is 600m from the Magdalen Grove SSSI, however this is a geological
site and as such it would only be subject to impacts in the case of a direct
land take.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Oxford Brookes University Marston Road Campus
Site area: 1.18 hectares/ 2.92 acres
Ward: Headington Hill and Northway
Landowner: Oxford Brookes University
Current use: Educational facilities
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.255 The site comprises of the former Milham Ford School, which closed in
2003 and is currently in use as the Oxford Brookes Marston Road Campus.
Oxford Brookes may cease educational use on the site and to dispose
of it within the Plan period, in which case the site would be suitable for
residential use. Access to the site is via Mary Price Close and McCabe Place
off Harberton Mead and from Jack Straw’s Lane, which is likely to be the
most suitable access if the site is redeveloped.


9.256 The former school building, built in the late 30s, early 40s is an imposing
building, built in a neo Georgian style with a triangular stone portico
containing a carved Oxford crest. Four tall elegant Cotswold limestone
Ionic columns surround the front door. All the red brickwork of the original
1939 building has the attractive chevron or diamond pattern, adding to
the striking symmetry of the frontage. The site lies within the setting of the
Headington Hill Conservation Area and it has an important relationship to
the conservation area.


9.257 The tree and hedge lined boundaries along Jack Straws Lane and Harberton
Mead are important features of the character of the area.


9.258 The site is adjacent to the Milham Ford Nature Park, on the site of the
former school playing fields. The strong relationship between the building
and landscaped setting of the open space should be retained. The Nature
Park includes areas of formal play and a tapestry of habitats. The New
Marston Meadows SSSI is within 600m of the site and is sensitive to
changes in the flows and quality of water in the river Cherwell due to
being in its floodplain. There have been issues previously with sewage
leakages, therefore the network capacity needs to be considered.


9.259 Development proposals should be carefully considered, giving regard to
the form of the existing building and the impact on the green setting of
the Nature Park.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Oxford Stadium (Greyhound Stadium)
Site area: 3.37 hectares/ 8.33 acres
Ward: Blackbird Leys
Landowner: Galliard Homes
Current use: Stadium used for community and leisure uses with associated
parking
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.260 The site is comprised of the former Oxford greyhound racing stadium,
which has also been used for speedway. The stadium last hosted
speedway in 2008. A number of commercial and community leisure uses
occupy the site currently, including Karting Oxford. The site is accessed
from Sandy Lane.


9.261 The greyhound racing and speedway events at Oxford Stadium were
popular and well attended. These represents important leisure activities
which should be resumed at the Oxford Stadium (alongside additional
appropriate and compatible leisure and hospitality uses). It is recognised
that the existing facilities at Oxford Stadium are likely to require investment
and modernisation to meet the current and future expectations of operators
and spectators. The City Council considers that there exist opportunities to
bring forward enabling residential development within the current car park
to facilitate such investment and modernisation.


9.262 The Oxford Stadium was designated as a Conservation Area in 2014,
following its addition to the City Council’s Heritage Assets Register. It is
considered to have heritage significance, with the location and character
of the stadium illustrating the socio-economic character of Oxford’s
eastern suburbs during the 20th Century. It is representative of inter-war
sport and entertainment within the city as part of Oxford’s early 20th
Century growth in response to development as a manufacturing centre.
The character and appearance of the area derives from its heritage interest
and provides physical evidence that represents the collective memory of
those working communities and their leisure pursuits. It has community
value, contributes to local distinctiveness and is a nationally rare form of
development. Preserving its spatial character is important therefore to
understanding the heritage of the area.


9.263 The opportunity exists to provide enabling residential development within
the existing Stadium car park. This residential development should preserve
and where possible enhance the significance of the conservation area of
which it is a part and should provide for retention and enhancement of the
community uses of the Stadium. The City Council has undertaken viability
testing that demonstrates that resumption of the use of the Stadium as
a greyhound racing and speedway venue can be achieved, supported by
enabling housing development to fund its modernisation if necessary. Any
planning permission for enabling residential development will be required
to include a commitment (through a planning obligation) to carry out,
as part of the development, an agreed scheme for refurbishment and
modernisation of the Stadium to facility recommencement of its former
leisure uses.


9.264 Enabling residential development and modernisation works to the Stadium
itself should conserve and enhance the character of the Conservation Area.
The ability to understand the area as a heritage asset is dependent on
preserving its spatial character including not only the individual buildings
but also the spaces between them such as the tracks, pits and greyhounds
paddocks that illustrate the purpose of the buildings and contribute to the
special historic interest and character and appearance of the area.


9.265 There should be no increase in parking and a loss of car parking is likely to
be acceptable as long as it can be demonstrated that access arrangements
will be adequate to support the leisure uses. This might be by improving
links across the railway nearby car parking. Any opportunity to link to a
new Cowley Branchline station should be taken.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Oxford University Press Sports Ground, Jordan Hill
Site area: 3.65 hectares/9.02 acres
Ward: Wolvercote
Landowner: Oxford University Press
Current use: Private sports ground
Flood Zone: FZ1

9.266 The site is currently open air sports facilities for Oxford University Press and
is adjacent to existing residential properties and Jordan Hill Business Park.
Outside groups are able to use the pitches on an ad hoc basis but demand
for the pitches has diminished and it is now not viable to operate.


9.267 Residential development would be an appropriate use on this site and some
complementary B1 uses may be suitable due to the site being adjacent to
the Jordan Hill Business Park. The loss of the majority of the sports facility
is considered justified due to the need for and benefits of new housing.
However, sports provision must be retained unless an alternative provision
is made or contributions are made to improving a local facility such that its
capacity increase replaces what is lost. If an alternative site is found then
10% of the site will be required for new public open space which should
be sited to make existing residents feel welcome to use it.


9.268 Any significant increase in traffic is likely to impact upon the nearby
Wolvercote and Cutteslowe roundabouts. Development will be subject to
appropriate mitigation measures.


9.269 Sewerage network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether
an upgrade to the sewerage network is required. Up to three years lead in
time could be required to undertake any such works.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

No.1 Pullens Lane
Site area: 0.42 hectares/ 1.04 acres
Ward: Headington Hill and Northway
Landowner: Carebase Ltd ?
Current use: Residential
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.270 The site is comprised of a detached 1960s two-storey house and garage
and substantial garden. The existing use of site is residential and there
are surrounding residential uses. The site would be suitable for residential
development, of general housing, elderly accommodation or specialist and
supported accommodation. The site is located on Pullens Lane, a quiet
narrow private road that adjoins Headington Road and is set within the
Headington Hill Conservation Area. There is a single narrow access to
the site at present through a gap in boundary vegetation leading to an
informal off-street parking space for a car. Any development that results in
increased traffic generation and intensification in use of Pullens Lane will
be subject to appropriate mitigation measures.


9.271 The site is within the Headington Hill Conservation Area. Any proposals
should have regard to the quiet and rural character and appearance of
the Conservation Area. Inappropriate levels of traffic generation must be
avoided. Important soft landscaping features should be retained.


9.272 The site does not have any biodiversity protections, but the ecological value
of the site must be assessed as part of a planning application and any harm
avoided, mitigated or compensated for. The hedgerows should be retained
as part of the design where possible.


9.273 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Radcliffe Observatory Quarter
Site area: 2.27 hectares/5.61 acres
Ward: North
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Vacant with some academic development
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.274 This site is within an area of predominantly attractive University and
residential buildings. The site excludes the listed building of the former St
Paul’s church but any development would need to ensure that there was
no adverse impact upon the setting of any listed buildings or conservation
area. Whilst there has already been considerable academic development
on the site, further applications are expected. Being an existing university
campus site, the site is suitable for further academic uses including student
accommodation and employer-linked housing. Development will be
considered against the endorsed masterplan for the site.


9.275 The site is within walking distance (600m) of the Port Meadow SSSI which
forms Part of the Oxford Meadows SAC. It is sensitive to air quality changes
due to the proximity to the railway line, and changes in hydrology. As the SAC
is within walking distance to proposed housing sites, there is susceptibility to
recreational pressure as a result of increased visitor numbers.


9.276 Sewerage network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether an
upgrade to the sewerage network is required.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Ruskin College Campus, Dunstan Road
Site area: 1.86 hectares/4.60 acres
Ward: Headington
Landowner: Ruskin College
Current use: Academic institutional, student accommodation
and sports facilities
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.277 Ruskin College is an adult residential college providing educational
opportunities for adults with little or no qualifications. There are nine
buildings on site including the listed Rookery and wall, set within landscaped
grounds with some large trees. The buildings are used for academic
purposes, student accommodation, student facilities, administration and
tennis courts as well as three buildings which are currently vacant. The site
has a masterplan which was endorsed by the North East Area Committee
in 2008 but with some issues that required further attention. Evidence for
Iron Age activity and Roman pottery production has been recorded from
this site so it has significant archaeological potential.


9.278 The site is suitable for further academic uses, student accommodation,
public open space and sports facilities. In accordance with Policy E3
only academic facilities of Ruskin College or the universities would be
considered suitable. Any development would need to ensure that there
was no adverse impact upon the setting of the listed buildings and Old
Headington conservation area.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Ruskin Field
Site area: 1.19 hectares/2.94 acres
Ward: Headington
Landowner: Ruskin College
Current use: Green open space, college fi elds
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.279 Ruskin Field sites to the north of Ruskin College on Dunstan Road. Much
of the area is not suitable for development because it would have a
substantial negative impact on the appearance, setting and character of
the Old Headington Conservation Area and is also visually sensitive from
the Elsfield View Cone. The southernmost third of Ruskin Fields is allocated
as a potential development site.


9.280 Development of the allocated part of the site would need to be carefully
and sensitively designed to preserve and enhance the setting of the listed
building and the character and appearance of the conservation area.


9.281 Design should reflect the constraints and opportunities of this part of the
site, including the existing pond, mature trees and hedges, views from the
listed building to the north, retaining gaps and views through the site to
the north and views of the site from the north.


9.282 The creation of a pedestrian / cycle access into the site from Stoke Place
would be supported. Vehicular access to the site is not possible via Stoke
Place or from the A40, although it is acknowledged that there is an existing
field gate access from the A40. Vehicular access to the site would need to
be through the college, which means the site is most suitable for expansion
of the college or employer-linked housing relating to the college, although
the college could provide an access road for general housing.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Slade House
Site area: 1.68 hectares/ 4.51 acres
Ward: Lye Valley
Landowner: Oxford Health NHS Trust
Current use: Former NHS care facility
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.283 The site was previously used as an NHS care facility, but is currently used
for staff training and office accommodation, not at full capacity. A number
of buildings on the site are currently vacant. The Oxford Health NHS
Trust’s ongoing review of healthcare facilities might find that this site is
needed, but it is more likely that additional need will be incorporated into
Warneford or Littlemore sites, which have capacity. This site is a suitable
site for a healthcare facility or for residential development. Residential
development could be market housing. However, this site is one of only
a few sites owned by the Oxford Health NHS Trust, and also presents an
opportunity for them to develop employer-linked housing on the site.


9.284 The site is within 200m of the Shotover and Brasenose Wood SSSI, which
is sensitive to recreational pressure. Access to the site is taken via Horspath
Driftway and Agwar Stone Road. If redeveloped, consideration should be
given to the creation of pedestrian and cycle links through the site to the
neighbouring residential areas off Agwar Stone Road.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Summertown House, Apsley Road
Site area: 0.29 hectares/0.72 acres
Ward: Summertown
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Graduate student accommodation and nursery
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.285 This site is currently graduate accommodation and an associated nursery.
There is some potential to make more efficient use of the site by developing
further graduate accommodation on open areas. There is a listed building
in the centre of the site and any development would be expected to
preserve and enhance the house and its setting. Given that the site is a
university campus site it would be suitable for employer-linked housing.

9.286 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Union Street Car Park
Site area: 0.25 hectares/0.62 acres
Ward: St Clement’s
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: Public car park
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.287 This site is within the busy Cowley Road District Centre which has a variety of
uses including retail, restaurants, residential and student accommodation.
There is high potential for archaeological interest on the site as it is within
the general area of a poorly understood Civil War parliamentary siege line.


9.288 The City and County Council are seeking to reduce the use of the private
car within Oxford and a reduction in car parking would discourage car
use although the car park is important to local traders and its total loss
would be detrimental. The City Council has undertaken a review of its
public car parks and considers that there is potential to develop residential
or student accommodation above the car park which will result in the
loss of some car parking spaces. Sufficient car parking spaces should be
retained at a level at which the City Council considers is reasonable to
serve and safeguard the vitality of the local area bearing in mind the quality
of public transport to the area and the current level of usage of the car
park. Supporting information justifying the proposed level of car parking
spaces should accompany any application. The retained car parking could
be in a different form such as beneath ground level (undercroft), decking
or surface level with buildings above.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

University of Oxford Science Area and Keble Road Triangle
Site area: 12.4 hectares/30.64 acres
Ward: Holywell
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Academic institutional
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.289 This site is in the scientific core of the University of Oxford and includes four
plots each containing a number of buildings in academic use. Some of the
buildings are listed and development would be expected to have regard to
these and the Conservation Area. There is high potential for archaeological
interest on the site as it is in an area with Bronze Age barrows, Iron Age and
Roman activity and Civil War defences. The site is adjacent to designated
Green Belt land and is within 600m from the New Marston Meadows SSSI.


9.290 The University would like to develop many of its buildings within the
site to improve the quality of the academic facilities and add some
new floorspace. Development will be considered against any endorsed
masterplan for the site which would help ensure that development occurs
as part of a comprehensive plan for the area and seek to add character and
have regard to the listed buildings and Conservation Area.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Valentia Road Site
Site area: 0.76 ha
Ward: Churchill
Landowner: Oxford City Council
Current use: Recreational area
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.291 Valentia Road is a small area of land currently in use as an informal kick
around area and a small play park. Some of the site, to the northern end
could be developed for housing, whilst leaving some recreational space to
the south. Although development would result in the loss of some public
open space in this part of Headington, the loss is considered justified
because of the need for and benefits of new housing.


9.292 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

West Wellington Square
Site area: 0.88 hectares/2.17 acres
Ward: Carfax
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Academic institutional uses
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.293 This site is within the conservation area, to which many of the buildings
make a positive contribution. There is a high potential for archaeological
interest as it is the site of the Wellington Workhouse and a line of Civil War
defences. Access is limited to a single width carriageway between two
buildings off Walton Street and is not suitable for any material increase in
traffic movements.


9.294 The site could contribute to the University’s need to provide additional
graduate accommodation and staff housing. Given that the site is a
university campus site, it would be suitable for employer-linked housing.
The site would be likely to continue to contain some university academic
functions, although most of those existing on the site currently will be
relocated to the Radcliffe Observatory Quarter.


9.295 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that
the new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network
are likely to be required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network
is recommended to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes
place to support development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Wolvercote Paper Mill, Mill Road
Site area: 4.95 hectares/12.23 acres (Plot A)
1.77 hectares/4.37 acres (Plot B)
Ward: Wolvercote
Landowner: University of Oxford
Current use: Vacant former paper mill
Flood Zone: FZ2 but FZ1 for sequential test (for whole site)


9.296 The main site (Plot A) is a former paper mill located between the residential
area of Lower Wolvercote village and the A34, and partly within the
Wolvercote with Godstow Conservation Area. The site boundary includes
part of Duke’s Meadow to the north of the site (Plot B). Any proposals
will be expected to preserve and enhance the character and setting of the
conservation area. Part of the site may be noisy as it is adjacent to the A34.


9.297 Plot A is suitable for residential development. Complementary small scale
employment units, employing a maximum of 50 people in total to reflect
the previous level of employment on site, and community facilities would
also be suitable. Residential development would increase the pressure on
primary school places which the County Council are able to address by the
expansion of existing schools. Small areas of Plot A are within the Green
Belt so built development will not be permitted in these areas.


9.298 The site is within 200m of the Oxford Meadows Special Area of
Conservation (SAC). Plans which could affect a SAC must be assessed
under the European Habitats Directive. The allocation of the site has been
assessed by a Habitats Regulation Assessment (HRA) which concluded
that development of the Wolvercote Paper Mill site is unlikely to significantly
affect surface water runoff to the SAC or significantly increase recreational
pressure on the SAC.


9.299 It also concluded that with safeguards included within the policy wording,
there will be no adverse effects on the air quality and water quality of the
SAC. Such effects can only be properly assessed and mitigated through
the design process at the planning application stage. Historically the site
operated as a paper mill and any development that leads to a reduction in
lorry traffic compared to the previous use is likely to result in no worsening
of air quality but this must be supported by an air quality assessment.
Groundwater fl ow from the North Oxford gravel terrace may have an
important role in maintaining water levels in the Wolvercote Common and
Port Meadow areas of the SAC. It is important that development proposals are
accompanied by a hydrological survey and include provision for sustainable
drainage. Hydrocarbon contaminants must not spread to the SAC.


9.300 Plot B is within the Green Belt and will not be granted permission for
any inappropriate development as defined in national planning guidance.
Proposals will be expected to create extensive new public open space for
the site and the local community on Plot B. This will reduce recreational
pressure on the SAC. The site includes part of Duke’s Meadow which is a
SLINC so opportunities should be taken to improve the biodiversity of the
site. The public open space must include dog waste bins so as to provide a
suitable alternative to walking dogs on the SAC.


9.301 Sewerage network capacity in this area is unlikely to be able to support
the demand anticipated from this development. Investigations by Thames
Water, funded by the applicant, will be necessary to determine whether
an upgrade to the sewerage network is required. Up to three years lead in
time could be required to undertake any such works.


9.302 Residential use on Plot A in Flood Zone 3a has been justified through the
sequential test although policies in the Core Strategy relating to development
in the floodplain will also need to be complied with. More vulnerable
development will be expected to be directed away from Flood Zone 3b.

 

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

Bayards Hill Primary School Part Playing Fields
Site area: 1.96 ha/ 4.84 acres
Ward: Barton & Sandhills
Landowner: Community School Alliance Trust
Current use: School Playing Field
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.303 This site is currently used as school playing fields. The eastern part of the
playing field, adjacent to the Barton Leisure Centre, will be released for
employer-linked housing to be occupied by those staff working for the
Community Schools Alliance Trust. This loss of playing field is justified
owing to need for and benefits of providing some employer linked housing
for the educational trust.


9.304 Given the existing pressures in the Gas Network and the increases that the
new development proposed would create, upgrades to the network may be
required. As such early discussion with the Gas Network is recommended
to ensure that the timely delivery of infrastructure takes place to support
development.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.

William Morris Close Sports Ground
Site area: 1.24 hectares/ 3.06 acres
Ward: Cowley Marsh
Landowner: Cantay Estates Ltd
Current use: Cricket pitch and associated car parking
Flood Zone: FZ1


9.305 The site is open space, with previous use as sports pitches for the Rover Sports
and Social Club. The site is now a fenced off grassed area. It is surrounded by
residential development on three sides and a school on the fourth side.


9.306 Residential use would be an appropriate use on this site. The loss of the
majority of the sports facility is considered justified because of the need for
and benefits of new housing. However, sports provision must be retained
unless alternative provision is made or contributions are made to improving
a local facility such that its capacity increase replaces what is lost. 10% of
the site will be required for new public open space, which should be sited to
make existing residents feel welcome to use it.


9.307 The site is close to the Crescent Road view cone and there is a view
from the site across Headington Hill with glimpses of the spires. This
should be considered and celebrated in design, with access to the view
facilitated. Connection improvements should also inform the alignment of
design proposals and additional pedestrian/cycle connection to adjacent
residential development should be created. The entrance to the site should
be viewable from Barracks Lane and should complement the school. Routes
should be as permeable and circulatory as possible.

Questions

There are questions you can answer here, but you must either register or log in first.